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Manchester thinkers set out challenges for future Government

12 Apr 2010

Leaders in policy areas crucial to the future of Greater Manchester are to set out the challenges facing the city region which will need to be tackled by the next Government.

In an event organised by the Brooks World Poverty Institute and the Institute for Political and Economic Governance -  both at The University of Manchester  - the experts in housing, economics, transport and the environment will present their views to the public on 13 April.

Will Hutton, Executive Chair of the Work Foundation will kick off the debate at the Friends Meeting House, Manchester at 6PM.

The organisers hope the material will set out some important areas for discussion in the election campaign over the next few weeks.

Will Hutton will be followed by:

•    Professor Alan Harding, Director of the  Institute for Political and Economic Governance at the University of Manchester on the economy.
•    Caroline Downey Executive Director of sustainability charity MERCi, on the  environment.
•    David Campbell,  Transport Research Unit, GMCVO on transport
•    Brendan Nevin, Director of Nevin Leather Associates on housing.

“The debate over the future of Greater Manchester is for sure taking place  - but  only among a small number of decision-makers," said organiser  Professor Kevin Ward, from The University of Manchester.

"So in the run up to the elections we feel that it is crucial for the public to get involved in thinking through the future of this great city region."

Professor Ward added: "In recent decades there have been some high-profile achievements in Manchester and the surrounding city region.

"The airport, the regeneration of the city centre after the bomb, our vibrant culture, Sportcity, the tram system and the regenerated Salford waterfront are all excellent examples."

"But despite these, severe levels of deprivation, endemic low pay in many parts of the economy, an aging housing stock, growing environmental concerns, and a struggling public infrastructure continue to be very real problems."

"The on-going economic crisis and the election of a new Government presents the citizens of the city region with an opportunity to take stock.

"So we ask: how has the city region changed over the last few decades and are the various changes sustainable?

"What's in store for the economy and the environment in the next five or ten years and what sort of city region do we actually want?"

Notes for editors

What's next for the Manchester city region? Will take place on Tuesday 13 April 2010 at the  Friends Meeting House, Mount Street, Manchester,  from 6-9pm

Presentations and speeches will be available at http://www.bwpi.manchester.ac.uk/events/index.html

Full itinerary available on request.

Professor Ward is available for interview

For media enquiries, contact:
Mike Addelman
Media Relations
Faculty of Humanities
The University of Manchester
0161 275 0790
07717 881567
michael.addelman@manchester.ac.uk