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29
June
2016
|
14:51
Europe/London

EU Referendum: Statement

Aerial+view+of+campus

A statement from President and Vice-Chancellor of The University of Manchester, Professor Dame Nancy Rothwell:

"I wanted to share with you some details and some personal thoughts about the impact of last week's referendum vote for the United Kingdom to leave the European Union.

"Firstly, I want to reassure you that The University of Manchester is, and will remain, not just a UK, but also a global university that embraces staff and students, and academic and business partnerships from across the world. It is particularly important at this time that we welcome and support our current and future colleagues and students from Europe and other continents and show them how much they are valued.

"I know from the many messages that I have received since Friday, that the referendum outcome is cause for concern and some distress for many staff and students, particularly those who are nationals of other EU countries and/or who hold grants or are working in partnerships with other EU agencies or institutions.

"Until we are informed about any detailed Government plans, it is not possible to predict precise consequences or to offer any concrete assurances. I have established a group of senior colleagues that I will chair to consider expert advice and explore all of the likely consequences in greater detail.

Statement continues below the video:

"For the moment, we can assume that for some while - which may well be two years or more - there will be:

  • no change in the immigration status of EU students currently studying at the University or planning to join in 2016;
  • no change in immigration or employment status for EU nationals currently employed by the University or planning to join us;
  • no change in fee status - and continued access to student loans until the end of their course - for EU students currently studying at the University or planning to join us in 2016;
  • no change to existing EU-funded grants or collaborative projects with other EU institutions;
  • no change to the way in which we collaborate with academic, industrial and commercial partners.

"We should all continue to focus on our core activities. We will be using all of our influence and all available channels to try to ensure the best long-term outcomes. We have set up some web pages (www.manchester.ac.uk/EU) to keep you informed as the situation develops. We have also set up a special email address (EU@manchester.ac.uk ) where you can send your comments and queries (recognising, of course, that we may not be able to answer all of your questions at the present time, but we will do our best).

"As a global university, we know that world-class scholarship and research requires the flexible movement and exchange of staff, students and ideas to facilitate collaboration and partnerships within Europe and beyond. The University of Manchester and the City of Manchester have benefitted enormously from the study, research and investment opportunities afforded by the European Union and other international partnerships over recent years, as will be evidenced when we welcome 4,000 international scientists to our city for the EuroScience Open Forum (ESOF) next month. I am determined to use all the University's networks, contacts and influence to ensure that these continue and are enhanced in the years ahead.

"Our immediate priority right now must be to reaffirm our position as a global University and to come together across the University community to provide support for staff, students and collaborators who are affected in different ways by the referendum vote."