31
January
2017
|
13:08
Europe/London

University marks World Cancer Day

World Cancer Day on February 4 is a chance for us all to explore what everyone – as a collective or as individuals – can do their part to reduce the global burden of cancer.

The University of Manchester’s cancer researchers are playing their part, with an approach that spans the full spectrum of combating the disease.

To mark the day, the University is holding a public engagement event on Friday 3 February. Supporting the University’s key focus on prevention and early detection.

Visitors will be able to find out how they can do their part to reduce the global burden of cancer though lifestyle changes from cancer awareness nurses and other healthcare professionals.

And they will also be able to meet scientists and get hands on with the research leading advances in personalised medicine, targeted treatment and immunotherapy.

There will be a chance to look at cancer cells on Virtual Reality lab tours and find out how to get involved with supporting cancer prevention and healthy lifestyle initiatives in the community.

University of Manchester research ranges from understanding the molecular and cellular basis of cancer to the development and testing of novel drugs and other therapeutic approaches.

Through nursing, psychology and policy work, solutions to the physical, emotional and economic impacts of cancer are being researched and put into practice across the University.

Led by world-renowned scientists cancer research at the University has the academic strength to match the weight of our partnerships and the benefits of our location.

Professor Sir Salvador Moncada
Manchester is an internationally recognised centre for cancer research through its combined efforts with the Christie Hospital, and Cancer Research UK. Our strategic objective besides developing excellent up-to-date treatment is to concentrate on the prevention and early detection of this disease. It is the success in prevention and early detention what will determine whether we reduce substantially the damage caused by cancer to individuals and to society
Professor Sir Salvador Moncada

University links with NHS organisations and cancer charities – as well as the support of the local population – make for an unrivalled beacon of research, where outstanding clinical work is leading to innovative techniques and personalised treatments.

Through the Manchester Cancer Research Centre the University works with Cancer Research UK and The Christie NHS Foundation Trust to turn fundamental discoveries in the laboratory into better, more effective, treatments for cancer patients. The Centre’s new building provides world-class facilities for cutting-edge translational research.

Trials led to anastrozole replacing tamoxifen as the major endocrine therapy for breast cancer, a development that has benefited 1.5 million women globally. Partnerships with companies such as AstraZeneca and GlaxoSmithKline bring new drugs to the market.

And Manchester scientists are reaching out to where help is needed most – such as in Uganda, where academics and medics are helping to roll out a national programme of cervical cancer screening.

Professor Sir Salvador Moncada, who is Director of the University of Manchester Cancer Domain said: “Manchester is an internationally recognised centre for cancer research through its combined efforts with the Christie Hospital, and Cancer Research UK.

“Our strategic objective besides developing excellent up-to-date treatment is to concentrate on the prevention and early detection of this disease.

“It is the success in prevention and early detention what will determine whether we reduce substantially the damage caused by cancer to individuals and to society.”

The exhibition takes place in the Foyer, University Place, Oxford Road, 11am-2pm Friday 3 February. The lightening talks will take place 12 noon-1pm.

Cancer is one of The University of Manchester’s research beacons - examples of pioneering discoveries, interdisciplinary collaboration and cross-sector partnerships that are tackling some of the biggest questions facing the planet. #ResearchBeacons

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