redirectUri = /postgraduate/researchdegrees/researchdegrees/bysubject/03201/russian-studies-phd/all-content/
Russian Studies PhD - 2014 entry | The University of Manchester
Skip to navigation | Skip to main content | Skip to footer

Russian Studies PhD

View tabs | View full page

Fact file

Degree awarded
PhD
Duration
36 months full-time, 72 months part-time
Entry requirements

Successful completion of a Masters course with an overall classification of Merit or higher, or its overseas equivalent, with an element of research training, is a prerequisite for entry to a PhD. A research proposal must be included with the formal application materials. 

Full entry requirements

Number of places/applicants
There is no limit on the number of places available.
How to apply

For details of how to apply, go to: Apply online

Programme options

Full-timePart-timeFull-time distance learningPart-time distance learning
PhDYYNN

Programme description

Staff in Russian and East European Studies conduct research of an interdisciplinary nature across a broad range of subjects, including nineteenth- and twentieth-century literature and intellectual history; Soviet and post-Soviet cinema and the media; gender studies; memory studies; nationalism and ethnic politics historically and in the post-communist period; and post-communist transition in East Central Europe. The Discipline of Russian and East European Studies constitutes a core group of the Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies, which facilitates collaboration in research and postgraduate teaching and supervision among relevant members of staff across the Faculty of Humanities.

Russian and East European Studies at Manchester received the best overall score in the nationwide 2008 Research Assessment Exercise. In this evaluation, 35% of the subject area's publications were deemed to be `world-leading' and a total of 70% were rated as `world-leading' or `internationally excellent'.

Externally-funded research projects of staff in the Discipline of Russian and East European Studies include 'Mediating Post-Soviet Difference: An Analysis of Russian Television Representations of Inter-Ethnic Cohesion Issues' (AHRC-funded); `Comparative Approaches to Islam, Security and Television News: Implications for Policy Makers and the Media' (AHRC-funded), `Re-ordering post-Soviet Space: The Eurasian Union' and 'Anti-Semitism and National Identity in Hungarian Sound Film, 1931-44' (both funded by the Leverhulme Trust).

Conferences, and other research-related events organised by staff in Russian and East European Studies in 2013-14 include `The 'Natural Boundaries' of the Russian Empire and USSR: between Geopolitics and Science'; `Transnational Film and Hungarian National Identity: Sanctioned and Subversive Images of the Nation'; `What is Eurasia to us? Integration and Disintegration in Central Asia', and `Composing Urban History and the Politics of the Past in Poland'. A focal point for the Discipline's research activity is a regular Research Seminar, which features a mix of internal and external speakers and promotes debate between staff and postgraduates across the full spectrum of their research interests.

Fees

For entry in the academic year beginning September 2014, the tuition fees are as follows:

  • PhD (full-time)
    UK/EU students (per annum): £3,996
    International students (per annum): £14,000
  • PhD (part-time)
    UK/EU students (per annum): £1,998
    International students (per annum): £7,000

Please note for the majority of projects where experimentation requires further resource: higher fee bands (where quoted) will be charged rather than the base rate for supervision, administration and computational costs. The fees quoted above will be fully inclusive and, therefore, you will not be required to pay any additional bench fees or administration costs.

All fees for entry will be subject to yearly review and incremental rises per annum are also likely over the duration of the course for UK/EU students (fees are typically fixed for International students, for the course duration at the year of entry). For general fees information please visit: postgraduate fees. Always contact the department if you are unsure which fee applies to your project.

Scholarships/sponsorships

British and EU students intending to take a research degree (MPhil or PhD) in the School are eligible to apply for support from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). AHRC  and ESRC grants are competitive and provide payment of tuition fees and a maintenance stipend for UK students, and tuition fees (and a maintenance stipend, subject to eligibility criteria) for EU students. Please see the School website for further details.

The School also offers a limited number of bursaries and studentships on a competitive basis, details of which will be posted on the School website in January.

Contact details

Academic department
School of Arts, Languages and Cultures
Telephone
+44 (0)161 275 3559
Facsimile
+44 (0)161 275 3031
Email
Website
www.alc.manchester.ac.uk/subjects/russian/postgraduateresearch/taught/

Academic department overview

See: About us

Related subject areas

Entry requirements

Academic entry qualification overview

Successful completion of a Masters course with an overall classification of Merit or higher, or its overseas equivalent, with an element of research training, is a prerequisite for entry to a PhD. A research proposal must be included with the formal application materials. 

English language

Students whose first language is not English require:

an overall IELTS score of 7.0 with 7.0 in the writing component

or

a TOEFL score of 600 paper-based test, 250 computer-based test, or 100 internet-based test

or

a Pearson Test of English (PTE) score of 70 overall with 70 in the writing component

English language test validity

Some English language test results are only valid for two years. Your English language test report must be valid on the start date of the course.

Other international entry requirements

We accept a range of qualifications from different countries. For these and general requirements including English language see entry requirements from your country.

How to apply

For details of how to apply, go to: Apply online

Re-applications

If you applied in the previous year and your application was not successful you may apply again. Your application will be considered against the standard course entry criteria for that year of entry. In your new application you should demonstrate how your application has improved. We may draw upon all information from your previous applications or any previous registrations at the University as a student when assessing your suitability for your chosen course.

Programme description

Staff in Russian and East European Studies conduct research of an interdisciplinary nature across a broad range of subjects, including nineteenth- and twentieth-century literature and intellectual history; Soviet and post-Soviet cinema and the media; gender studies; memory studies; nationalism and ethnic politics historically and in the post-communist period; and post-communist transition in East Central Europe. The Discipline of Russian and East European Studies constitutes a core group of the Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies, which facilitates collaboration in research and postgraduate teaching and supervision among relevant members of staff across the Faculty of Humanities.

Russian and East European Studies at Manchester received the best overall score in the nationwide 2008 Research Assessment Exercise. In this evaluation, 35% of the subject area's publications were deemed to be `world-leading' and a total of 70% were rated as `world-leading' or `internationally excellent'.

Externally-funded research projects of staff in the Discipline of Russian and East European Studies include 'Mediating Post-Soviet Difference: An Analysis of Russian Television Representations of Inter-Ethnic Cohesion Issues' (AHRC-funded); `Comparative Approaches to Islam, Security and Television News: Implications for Policy Makers and the Media' (AHRC-funded), `Re-ordering post-Soviet Space: The Eurasian Union' and 'Anti-Semitism and National Identity in Hungarian Sound Film, 1931-44' (both funded by the Leverhulme Trust).

Conferences, and other research-related events organised by staff in Russian and East European Studies in 2013-14 include `The 'Natural Boundaries' of the Russian Empire and USSR: between Geopolitics and Science'; `Transnational Film and Hungarian National Identity: Sanctioned and Subversive Images of the Nation'; `What is Eurasia to us? Integration and Disintegration in Central Asia', and `Composing Urban History and the Politics of the Past in Poland'. A focal point for the Discipline's research activity is a regular Research Seminar, which features a mix of internal and external speakers and promotes debate between staff and postgraduates across the full spectrum of their research interests.

Teaching and learning

The PhD is the major postgraduate research degree. It involves three years of full-time study or six years of part-time study and the preparation of a thesis of not more than 80,000 words that makes a significant contribution to knowledge. A satisfactory PhD topic is one that a suitably qualified and properly supervised student can bring to completion within the permitted timeframe. Please note, all PhD students are required to undertake Research Training as part of their PhD programme.

Coursework and assessment

Your research will normally be supervised by two members of staff at the University. Your supervisors will most likely be members of the School, but if your research requires it, the School or Subject area may arrange for supervision by someone outside the School. Supervisory arrangements at Manchester are governed by a Code of Practice which is available on the University's website. Regular meetings will be held with the supervisors, and details of each of the meetings will be recorded. Research Panels (consisting of at least three academic staff, including the supervisors) are held once per semester to monitor progress.

Please note, the first year of the full-time programme and the first two years of the part-time programme are probationary; this means you will be required to show evidence of satisfactory progress in order to proceed with the programme.

Facilities

For more information on the facilities available within the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures, please visit http://www.alc.manchester.ac.uk/graduateschool/places/

In addition, the University has five major computer clusters, together with many smaller clusters. In total there are more than 10,000 PCs and workstations across the campus. All provide access to standard office software as well as specialist programs, and all are connected to the campus network and internet. Every student is registered for email, file storage and internet access. If more demanding computer access is required, our specialist computing division Manchester Computing can provide high-end and specialist computing services.

The  University of Manchester Library is one of the best-resourced academic libraries in the UK and is widely recognised as one of the world's greatest research libraries. We also have one of the largest academic IT services in Europe - supporting world-class teaching and research.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Support Office. Email: disability@manchester.ac.uk