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MRes Experimental Cancer Medicine at The University of Manchester
MRes Experimental Cancer Medicine
This course will enable you to work within a leading Phase 1 cancer clinical trials unit.

MRes Experimental Cancer Medicine

Year of entry: 2018

Course unit details:
Research Project 1

Unit code MEDN66121
Credit rating 30
Unit level FHEQ level 7 – master's degree or fourth year of an integrated master's degree
Teaching period(s) Semester 1
Offered by School of Medical Sciences
Available as a free choice unit? No

Overview

The initial part of Research project 1 is a supervised literature review on an important current research topic in the field. The second part of the unit will involve students formulating a research proposal that arises from their literature studies.

Aims

The aims of Research Project 1 are to train students in:

          • Literature and database searching

          • Critical analysis

          • Identification, conceptualisation and exposition of unsolved problems

          • Literature review planning

          • Creating and using appropriate images

          • Scientific writing and referencing

          • Research proposal design

          • Critical evaluation and debate

          • Effective time management

Learning outcomes

Students should be able to:

       • Identify and isolate basic scientific, translational, clinical (and where relevant) epidemiological, demographic and social elements of their research problem

       • Synthesise and analyse data and information

       • Show critical thinking capacity, including abstraction, analysis and critical judgement

       • Report on the current status of research in a chosen area

       • Pose a problem, framing it in a fashion that is amenable to solution

       • Command an appropriate battery of communication skills - written and spoken word, images and electronic media - to engage in constructive dialogue with peers and supervisor

       • Use effective word processing and reference manager software

       • Use library, electronic and online resources

       • Develop appropriate illustrative materials for a report

       • Make a written presentation using language appropriate to a specialist readership

       • Collect and integrate evidence to formulate and test a research hypothesis

       • Plan time effectively, apportioning appropriate energy to literature research and writing while undertaking other essential course activities

       • Meet agreed informal and formal deadlines for writing assignments

Teaching and learning methods

•            Regular (2 weekly) consultations with supervisor starting with project orientation meeting and starter references.  Email exchanges with supervisor. 

•            Regular informal contacts with research staff with overlapping interests. 

•            Training in critical evaluation of published work, and locating the edge of current knowledge.  How to distinguish ‘I don’t understand this’ from ‘ the answer is not known’, leading to the identification of an important unsolved problem.

•            Scientific writing: constructive feedback and improvement.  

•            Training in project design and formulation of hypothesis in close consultation with supervisor - on-line guidelines.

Knowledge and understanding

On completion of this Unit the student should be able to:

  • identify and isolate basic scientific, translational, clinical, (and where relevant) epidemiological, demographic and social elements of their research problem
  • undertake background work to provide themselves with the intellectual foundations for a full understanding of their chosen area, especially where interdisciplinarity demands a wider frame of reference than former training might have required
  • report on the current status of research in a chosen area 

Intellectual skills

On completion of this Unit the student should be able to:

  • show critical thinking capacity, including abstraction, analysis and critical judgement
  • pose a problem, framing it in a fashion that is amenable to solution
  • synthesise and analyse data and information
  • command an appropriate battery of communication skills – written and spoken word and images – to engage in constructive dialogue with peers and supervisor
  • critically reflect and evaluate
  • be able to make a reasoned argument for a particular point of view
  • be able to draw reasoned conclusions

Practical skills

On completion of this Unit the student should be able to:

  • use effective word processing
  • use library, electronic and online resources
  • use reference manager software
  • develop appropriate illustrative materials for a report

Transferable skills and personal qualities

On completion of this Unit the student should be able to:

  • to improve their own learning through planning, monitoring, critical reflection, evaluation and altering strategies
  • to use word processing, database, spreadsheet and presentation software and the Internet
  • independently gather, sift, synthesise and organise material from various sources (including library, electronic and online resources), and critically evaluate its significance.
  • make a written presentation using language appropriate to a specialist readership
  • collect and integrate evidence to formulate and test a research hypothesis

Employability skills

Analytical skills
Critical Evaluation
Research
Experience of devising and preparing research proposals

Assessment methods

Method Weight
Other 50%
Dissertation 50%

The literature review and research proposal are equally weighted and both contribute 50% towards the final mark for this unit.

Feedback methods

Formative feedback is provided by a supervisor for both the literature review and research proposal on:

·         a detailed plan,

·         a one page excerpt of the report for academic writing style,

·         a single full draft of the report.

 

Submitted reports will be annotated by assessors and detailed feedback given on the marksheet.

Recommended reading

Students will receive starter references relevant to their research projects from their supervisor(s).

Study hours

Independent study hours
Independent study 300

Teaching staff

Staff member Role
Ashraf Kitmitto Unit coordinator
John Aplin Unit coordinator
Guy Makin Unit coordinator
Sarah Herrick Unit coordinator
Elizabeth Cartwright Unit coordinator
Kimme Hyrich Unit coordinator
Forbes Manson Unit coordinator
Rebecca Jones Unit coordinator
Janine Lamb Unit coordinator
John Curtin Unit coordinator

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