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BA History and Sociology
Examine societies past and present from historical and sociological perspectives.

This course is unavailable through clearing

This course is now full for our 2019 entry, but have a look at our clearing vacancies to see if a similar course has space.

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BA History and Sociology

Year of entry: 2019

Overview

Degree awarded
Bachelor of Arts (BA)
Duration
3 years
Typical A-level offer
ABB
Typical contextual A-level offer (what is this?)
Grades BBB (not including General Studies) to include History or Sociology.
Typical International Baccalaureate offer

Equivalents to A-level grades are as follows:

A*AA: 37 points overall, with 7,6,6 in Higher Level subjects.

AAA:  36 points overall, with 6,6,6 in Higher Level subjects.

AAB:  35 points overall, with 6,6,5 in Higher Level subjects.

ABB:  34 points overall, with 6,5,5 in Higher Level subjects.

NOTE: please check A-Levels for subject requirements.

Full entry requirements

How to apply
Apply through UCAS

Course overview

  • Study at a university ranked 7th in the UK for History (QS World University Rankings 2018).
  • Explore past and present societies from both a historical and a sociological perspective.
  • Use your knowledge of both to understand human civilisations.
  • Get a thorough induction into studying the past, alongside the approaches and theoretical frameworks relating to the study of society.

Open days

Our open days are a great opportunity for you to:
  • get a taste for campus life and the city more broadly;
  • find out about our subject areas and courses from current students and academic staff;
  • explore our facilities through self-guided and dedicated tours;
  • gain insight into your subject area through talks and taster sessions;
  • ask questions and gather all the additional information you need to help with your decision-making.

Find out more about our forthcoming open days , including how to register.

Fees

Tuition fees for home/EU students commencing their studies in September 2019 will be £9,250 per annum. Tuition fees for international students will be £18,500 per annum. For general information please see the undergraduate finance pages.

Policy on additional costs

All students should normally be able to complete their programme of study without incurring additional study costs over and above the tuition fee for that programme. Any unavoidable additional compulsory costs totalling more than 1% of the annual home undergraduate fee per annum, regardless of whether the programme in question is undergraduate or postgraduate taught, will be made clear to you at the point of application. Further information can be found in the University's Policy on additional costs incurred by students on undergraduate and postgraduate taught programmes (PDF document, 91KB).

Contact details

School/Faculty
School of Arts, Languages and Cultures
Contact name
Gail Dickinson
Telephone
+44 (0)161 306 1251
Email
Website
http://www.alc.manchester.ac.uk/subjects/history/
School/Faculty overview

See: About us

Courses in related subject areas

Use the links below to view lists of courses in related subject areas.

Compare this course

Entry requirements

A-level

Grades ABB to include Grade A in History or Sociology.  General Studies is welcomed but not included as part of the standard offer.

AS-level

AS level results are not considered as part of the standard admissions process at The University of Manchester.

Unit grade information

The University of Manchester welcomes the provision of unit information where available.  Like all other information provided by applicants this may be taken into consideration when assessing your application.  Unit grades will not normally form part of an offer conditions.

GCSE

Applicants must demonstrate a broad general education including acceptable levels of Literacy and Numeracy, equivalent to at least Grade C or 4 in GCSE English Language and Mathematics (note that some degree programmes may require a higher grade than this - please see individual programme requirements). GCSE English Literature will not be accepted in lieu of GCSE English Language.

International Baccalaureate

Equivalents to A-level grades are as follows:

A*AA: 37 points overall, with 7,6,6 in Higher Level subjects.

AAA:  36 points overall, with 6,6,6 in Higher Level subjects.

AAB:  35 points overall, with 6,6,5 in Higher Level subjects.

ABB:  34 points overall, with 6,5,5 in Higher Level subjects.

NOTE: please check A-Levels for subject requirements.

Scottish requirements

Before reading this, please consult the A-level requirements for this programme and note any subject requirements.

For applicants who have studied under the new Scottish qualification system, the following will apply.

For programmes which have no particular pre-requisite subject , we require the following (in all cases, at least three Highers should be achieved by the end of S5):

  • A*AA at A-level :  Hrs of AAAAAB or AAAB plus Adv Hr Gr. A
  • AAA at A-level   :  Hrs of AAAABB or AABB plus Adv Hr Gr. A
  • AAB at A-level   :  Hrs of AAABBB or ABBB plus Adv Hr Gr. A
  • ABB at A-level   :  Hrs of AAABBB or ABBB plus Adv Hr at min. Gr. B

Where pre-requisite subjects are cited in our A-level requirements , we require the following (in all cases, at least three Highers should be achieved by the end of S5 AND Grade A should be achieved at Adv Hr in the required subject):

  • A*AA at A-level : Hrs of AAA plus either two Adv Hrs at Grs. AA, or one Adv Hr and two Hrs at Grs. AA
  • AAA at A-level   : Hrs of AAB plus either two Adv Hrs at Grs. AA, or one Adv Hr and two Hrs at Grs. AA
  • AAB at A-level   : Hrs of ABB plus either two Adv Hrs at Grs. AB, or one Adv Hr and two Hrs at Grs. AB
  • ABB at A-level   : Hrs of BBB plus either two Adv Hrs at Grs. AB, or one Adv Hr and two Hrs at Grs. AB

For applicants who have studied under the old Scottish qualification system , Highers are welcomed but will not be accepted alone.  The minimum requirement is three Advanced Highers, the grades of which will be the same as our stated A-level grades for the course in question.  Any subjects (or other qualifications) required for A-level will also be required for the Advanced Highers, at the equivalent grade.

All applicants must have achieved National 5 English at Grade B.

Welsh Baccalaureate

The University welcomes and recognises the value of the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma/Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate and usually requires two A Levels or equivalent to be included within this.

The minimum grade required will normally be the same as the lowest grade listed in the A Level entry requirements.

If you require further clarification about the acceptability of this qualification please contact the academic School(s) you plan to apply to.

European Baccalaureate

77% to include a mark of at least 8.0 in either in History or Sociology

AQA Baccalaureate

The University recognises the benefits of the AQA Baccalaureate and the opportunities it provides for applicants to develop independent study and research skills.

In making offers, the University will focus on the three A Levels taken within the AQA Baccalaureate. Students need to check the standard A Level requirements for their chosen course.

The units of broader study, enrichment activities and the Extended Project are considered to be valuable elements of the AQA Baccalaureate and we would therefore strongly encourage students to draw upon these experiences within their personal statement.

Other international entry requirements

We accept a range of qualifications from different countries. For these and general requirements including English language see Accepted entry qualifications from your country

Pearson BTEC qualifications

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma: we require Distinction / Distinction / Merit.  We also require an A-level Grade A in either History or Sociology.

BTEC Level 3 National Diploma: we require Distinction / Merit, plus one A-level at Grade A in either History or Sociology.

BTEC Level 3 National Foundation Diploma: we require a Distinction, plus one A-level at min. Grade A in either History or Sociology, plus an EPQ or AS at Grade B.

BTEC National Extended Certificate: we require a Distinction, plus two A-levels at Grades AB (the Grade A must be in either History or Sociology.

OCR Cambridge Technical qualifications

Cambridge Level 3 Technical Extended Diploma (CTEC):  We do not consider the Technical Extended Diploma for entry to this course, as pre-requisite subjects are required.

Cambridge Level 3 Technical Diploma (CTEC): Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full Technical Diploma with grades DM plus an A Level at grade A in either History or Sociology.

Cambridge Level 3 Technical Foundation Diploma (CTEC):  Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full Technical Foundation Diploma with grades DD plus an A-level at min. Grade A in either History or Sociology, plus an EPQ or AS at Grade B.

Cambridge Level 3 Technical Extended Certificate (CTEC):  Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full Technical Extended Certificate with grade D plus two A Levels at grades AB; the Grade A should be in either History or Sociology.

Access to HE Diploma

Overall 60 credits are required with 45 at Level 3.  Applicants must also have EITHER GCSEs in both English and Mathematics (at Grade B/6 or higher), OR must demonstrate achievement at Level 2 (GCSE-equivalent) by, for example, having 6 credits each in English and Maths.  We also consider other factors such as additional educational achievements, life experience and skills on an individual basis.

Please read the A-level entry requirements for this programme and then look at the relevant set of Access requirements:

For programmes requiring A*AA and AAA: a minimum of 45 credits with a Distinction grade in a Humanities-related subject.  15 of these credits must be in the pre-requisite subject required for A-levels.

For programmes requiring AAB: a minimum of 39 credits with a Distinction grade, plus 6 credits with a Merit grade, all in a Humanities-related subject. 15 of the Distinction credits should be in the pre-requisite subject required for A-levels.

For programmes requiring ABB: a minimum of 30 credits with a Distinction grade, plus 15 credits with a Merit grade, all in a Humanities-related subject. 15 of the Distinction credits should be in the pre-requisite subject required for A-levels.

If you are applying to a programme involving History: all Access applicants will be required to produce a piece of written work, for assessment by the Admissions Tutor. Once you have applied, the Admissions Administrator will contact you with a list of topics/questions. You will be asked to choose one and produce a piece (1500 words) on that subject, for submission by the deadline given by the Administrator.

If you are applying to a programme involving one Language: you must also EITHER have GCSE Grade C/4 or higher in English Language or any Language, OR be able to demonstrate achievement at Level 2 (GCSE-equivalent) by, for example, having 6 credits in English Language or any Language at Level 2.

If you are applying to a programme involving two Languages : Applicants cannot begin both languages at beginners' level; they must already have an A-level or equivalent in one of the two Languages to be studied, as well as the Access qualification.

Cambridge Pre-U

We consider applicants offering Pre-U Principal Subjects, or a mix of Pre-U and A Level subjects, provided a minimum of three distinct subjects overall is taken.

Please note our A-level requirements for grades and any subject requirements for this programme.  Pre-U equivalencies will be:

  • AAA at A level = Candidates taking Pre-U principal subjects in conjunction with A levels are expected to achieve a combination of D3 in the Pre-U certificates and grade A at A level in three distinct subjects.  
  • AAB at A level = Candidates taking Pre-U principal subjects in conjunction with A levels are expected to achieve a combination of D3, D3, M2 in the Pre-U and AAB at A level in three distinct subjects.  
  • ABB at A level = Candidates taking Pre-U principal subjects in conjunction with A levels are expected to achieve a combination of D3, M2, M2 in the Pre-U and ABB at A level in three distinct subjects.

Extended Project Qualification (EPQ)

The University recognises the benefits of the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) and the opportunities it provides for applicants to develop independent study and research skills. Although the Extended Project will not be included in the conditions of your offer, we strongly encourage you to provide information about the EPQ in your personal statement and at interview. A number of our academic Schools may also choose to take your performance in the EPQ into account should places be available in August for applicants who narrowly miss the entry grades for their chosen course.

Core Maths

The University welcomes and recognises the value of Level 3 core mathematics qualifications (e.g. AQA Certificate in Mathematical Studies). 

Core Mathematics is not a compulsory element of post-16 study and as a result we will not normally include it in the conditions of any offer made to the student. However, if a student chooses to undertake a core mathematics qualification this may be taken into account when we consider their application, particularly for certain non-science courses with a distinct mathematical or statistical element.

We advise students to contact the academic School, who will clarify whether their specific portfolio of qualifications is acceptable for entry on to their chosen course.

Home-schooled applicants

If you are a student who has followed a non-standard educational route, e.g. you have been educated at home; your application will be considered against the standard entry criteria of the course for which you are applying. You will be required to demonstrate that you meet the specified academic entry requirements of the course. We will also require a reference from somebody who knows you well enough, in an official capacity, to write about you and your suitability for higher education. If you are a home schooled student and would like further information or advice please contact the academic School for your chosen course who will be able to help you. 

Non-standard educational routes

Mature students are some of our most well-equipped learners, bringing skills and attributes gained from work, family and other life experiences.  Students come from a whole array of backgrounds, study every kind of course, undertake full-time and part-time learning and are motivated by career intentions as well as personal interest.  There is no such thing as a typical mature student at Manchester.  The application process is the same as for other prospective undergraduates.  If you require further clarification about the acceptability of the qualifications you hold please contact the academic School(s) you plan to apply to.  Further information for mature students can be found here ( http://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/mature-students/ )

English language

All applicants to the University (from the UK and Overseas) are required to show evidence of English Language proficiency.  The minimum English Language requirement for this course is either:
  • GCSE English Language grade B /6, or;
  • IELTS 7.0, or;
  • An acceptable equivalent qualification.

The UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) requires that every student from outside the UK and the EU must show evidence of a minimum level of English Language in order to be granted a UK visa (Tier 4 visa) to study at undergraduate or postgraduate level. This level is often referred to as the 'B2 level'.

Additionally, our individual Schools may ask for specific English Language proficiency levels that are necessary for their academic programmes. In most cases these requirements are likely to be higher than the B2 level. Further information about our English Language policy, including a list of some of the English Language qualifications we accept, can be found  here .

English language test validity

Some English Language test results are only valid for two years. Your English Language test report must be valid on the start date of the course.

Application and selection

How to apply

Apply through UCAS

Advice to applicants

We are looking for applicants who have the predicted A-level grades (or other qualifications) for the relevant degree programme and whose personal statement demonstrates an enthusiasm for the subject.

How your application is considered

We read the personal statements and references of all applicants paying particular attention to A-level (or IB etc.) predictions or achieved grades.

Interview requirements

Normally, we only interview applicants who are applying with non-standard entry requirements.

Returning to education

Applications from mature students are welcomed and considered on an individual basis.

Such applicants will be required to produce a piece of written work, for assessment by the Admissions Tutor. Once you have applied, the Admissions Administrator will contact you with a list of topics/questions. You will be asked to choose one and produce a piece (1500 words) on that subject, for submission by the deadline given by the Administrator.

Deferrals

We welcome applications for deferred entry and feel a gap year benefits many students.

We do ask applicants to let us know as early as possible if they are intending to defer.  This helps us to adjust the number of offers we make, in order to achieve the required number of students in a given year.

Re-applications

If you applied in the previous year and your application was not successful you may apply again. Your application will be considered against the standard course entry criteria for that year of entry.  In your new application you should demonstrate how your application has improved.  We may draw upon all information from your previous applications or any previous registrations at the University as a student when assessing your suitability for your chosen course.If you are applying for a place for the same year of entry through UCAS Extra, you should provide additional evidence of your suitability for the course. If you are applying through clearing you are required to meet the clearing requirements. In both UCAS Extra and clearing the places will be subject to availability.

Transfers

We will consider applications to transfer to Manchester from other universities and would normally ask for a letter explaining why a transfer was needed, relevant transcripts, a copy of the applicant's UCAS form and a confidential reference from one of the applicant's current university tutors.

We will consider applications to transfer from other degrees within the University of Manchester but applicants are required to have the A-level grades (or other qualifications) needed for entry to that degree programme.

Both of the above are subject to our having enough places to accommodate such applicants.   Enquiries should be made to the admissions administrator for the subject (see contact details). 

Course details

Course description

BA History and Sociology will allow you to study past and present societies from both a historical and a sociological perspective, comparing and contrasting these two important ways of studying human society.

You will have the opportunity to study a wide historical and geographical range of periods and cultures, gaining a thorough sociological understanding of contemporary and practical social affairs and an understanding of their origins and development.

By combining the skills and insights of History and Sociology, you will achieve a thorough induction into studying the past alongside the approaches and theoretical frameworks relating to the study of society.

You will be offered a wide range of course units to choose from that will develop your knowledge of both disciplines, enhance your skills in analysis and critical reasoning, and improve your understanding and application of theoretical approaches to the past and present.

Special features

Placement year option

Apply your subject-specific knowledge in a real-world context through a placement year in your third year of study, enabling you to enhance your employment prospects, clarify your career goals and build your external networks.

Study abroad

You can apply to spend one semester studying abroad during Year 2, with exchange partners including those in Europe as well as the USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong and Singapore.

Connect with like-minded students

Our students have the opportunity to take part in history-related activities outside of the course, including the Manchester Histories Festival and our student-led publication - The Manchester Historian .

Explore world-class collections

Enjoy unique opportunities to explore special archived material and carry out research in a wide range of archives, libraries, museums and other research institutions in Manchester and beyond.

Teaching and learning

Most course units feature formal lectures supported by smaller tutorials, seminars or web-based seminars, in which you will be able to explore the contents of lectures and recommended reading in greater depth.

Tutorials and seminars are also key elements in improving your written and oral communication skills through group discussions, essay-writing and presentations.

You will spend approximately 12 hours a week in formal study sessions. For every hour spent at University, you will be expected to complete a further two to three hours of independent study. You will also need to study during the holiday periods.

A significant part of your study time will be spent reading, taking notes, preparing presentations and writing essays (which examine particular aspects of a subject in greater depth).

Classroom time is frequently supplemented by new media, such as the virtual learning environment, Blackboard. You will also have access to other digital resources to support your learning.

For some course units you'll join in group work and other forms of collaborative learning.

Coursework and assessment

You may be assessed in various ways, including:

  • written and oral examinations;
  • coursework essays;
  • research reports;
  • practical tests;
  • learning logs;
  • web contributions.

Many course units are assessed through a mixture of techniques.

In your final year, you will write a dissertation that constitutes 22% of your overall final mark.

Your second-year work counts toward 33% of your final degree result. Your third-year work accounts for the remaining 67%.

Course content for year 1

Course units for year 1

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optional
History in Practice HIST10101 20 Mandatory
Researching Culture and Society SOCY10440 20 Mandatory
From Reconstruction to Reagan: American History, 1877-1988 AMER10002 20 Optional
Constructing Archaic Greek History CAHE10011 20 Optional
From Republic to Empire: Introduction to Roman History, Society & Culture 218-31BC CAHE10022 20 Optional
Introduction to Mediterranean & Classical Archaeology CAHE10122 20 Optional
Living and Dying in the Ancient World CAHE10602 20 Optional
The Odyssey CLAH10101 20 Optional
Defining Digital Humanities DIGI10011 20 Optional
Modern China: from the Opium Wars to the Olympic Games HIST10151 20 Optional
Histories of the Islamic World HIST10172 20 Optional
Capitalism in Historical Perspective: 1700-1913 HIST10182 20 Optional
Imperial Nation: The Making of Modern Britain, 1783-1902 HIST10191 20 Optional
Back to the Future: The Uses and Abuses of History HIST10252 20 Optional
An Introduction to the Medieval World HIST10262 20 Optional
Forging a New World: Europe c.1450-1750 HIST10301 20 Optional
States, Nations and Empires. Europe, c.1750-1914 HIST10312 20 Optional
Science & the Modern World HSTM10221 10 Optional
Bodies in History: An introduction to the History of Medicine HSTM10272 10 Optional
Science and the Modern World (20 Credits) HSTM10721 20 Optional
Exploring Enterprise MCEL10001 10 Optional
Entrepreneurial Skills MCEL10002 10 Optional
Religion in Modern South Asian History RELT10222 20 Optional
Standing on The Shoulders of Giants: Foundations for Study in The Arts SALC10002 20 Optional
Social Inequalities in Contemporary Britain SOCY10401 20 Optional
Foundations of Social Thought SOCY10421 20 Optional
Contemporary Social Thought SOCY10432 20 Optional
Media, Culture & Society SOCY10441 20 Optional
Global Social Challenges SOCY10462 20 Optional
Sociology of Personal Life SOCY10471 20 Optional
Work, Organisations and Society SOCY10912 20 Optional
Understanding Social Media SOST10012 20 Optional
Measuring Inequalities SOST10021 20 Optional
Displaying 10 of 33 course units for year 1

Course content for year 2

Course units for year 2

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optional
Independent Research Project HIST20390 20 Mandatory
From Jamestown to James Brown: African-American History and Culture AMER20141 20 Optional
The Conquering Hero: The Life, Times and Legacy of Alexander The Great CAHE20042 20 Optional
The Roman Empire 31BC - AD235: Rome's Golden Age CAHE20052 20 Optional
Politics and Society in Classical Greece CAHE20061 20 Optional
Roman Women in 22 Objects CAHE20531 20 Optional
Introduction to the History and Culture of Pharaonic Egypt CAHE21442 20 Optional
Weimar Culture? Art, Film and Politics in Germany, 1918-33 GERM20262 20 Optional
Making of the Modern Mind: European Intellectual History in a Global Context HIST20181 20 Optional
Winds of Change: Politics, Society and Culture in Britain, 1899 -1990 HIST20251 20 Optional
Late Imperial China: From the Jesuits to the East India Company HIST20422 20 Optional
The Cultural History of Modern War HIST20482 20 Optional
Crisis and Prosperity in Twentieth-Century Europe HIST21112 20 Optional
Colonial Encounters: Race, Violence, and the Making of the Modern World HIST21121 20 Optional
From Catastrophe to Crusade: Europe in the Aftermath of the Vikings HIST21141 20 Optional
The Stuff of History: Objects Across Borders, 1500-1800 HIST21152 20 Optional
From Cholera to Aids: A Global History of Epidemics HSTM20031 10 Optional
From Cholera to Aids: A Global History of Epidemics HSTM20081 20 Optional
The Crisis of Nature: Issues in Environmental History HSTM20092 10 Optional
The Information Age HSTM20282 10 Optional
The Crisis of Nature: Issues in Environmental History HSTM20592 20 Optional
The Information Age HSTM20782 20 Optional
Aesthetics and Politics of Italian Fascism ITAL20501 20 Optional
Science and Civilisation in East Asia JAPA23002 20 Optional
History of Modern Islamic Thought MEST20501 20 Optional
Religion, Culture and Gender RELT20121 20 Optional
Goddesses, Demons and Stories in South Asian History: From Early Epics to the Present Day RELT21222 20 Optional
100 Years of Revolution: Russia from Lenin to Putin RUSS20242 20 Optional
The Making of Modern Russia RUSS20251 20 Optional
The 1989 Revolutions and their Aftermaths RUSS20471 20 Optional
Beginner's Statistics and Computing in Humanities SALC21002 20 Optional
All about Eve: Encountering the First Woman from Antiquity to Today SALC21132 20 Optional
Sociology of Popular Music SOCY20012 20 Optional
Work, Economy and Society SOCY20031 20 Optional
Social Network Analysis SOCY20041 20 Optional
Education and Society SOCY20052 20 Optional
Sociology of Science SOCY20081 20 Optional
Qualitative Research Design & Methods SOCY20091 20 Optional
Sustainability, Consumption & Global Responsibilities SOCY20232 20 Optional
New Media SOCY20241 20 Optional
Social Change in China SOCY20281 20 Optional
Self and Society SOCY20402 20 Optional
Social Thought From The Global South SOCY20501 20 Optional
Social Class and Inequality in Britain SOCY20602 20 Optional
Gender, Sexuality and Culture SOCY20892 20 Optional
Racism and Ethnicity in the UK SOCY20962 20 Optional
The Survey Method in Social Research SOST20012 20 Optional
Essential Enterprise UCIL22001 10 Optional
Essential Enterprise UCIL22002 10 Optional
The Art of Enterprise UCIL24002 10 Optional
Displaying 10 of 50 course units for year 2

Course content for year 3

Course units for year 3

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optional
The Visual Culture of US Empire AMER30522 20 Optional
American Hauntings AMER30811 20 Optional
Athens and Attica CAHE30052 20 Optional
The Roman Army and the North-West Frontiers CAHE30882 20 Optional
Egypt in the Graeco-Roman Worl CAHE31401 20 Optional
Screening the Holocaust GERM30481 20 Optional
Culture and Society in Germany 1871-1918 GERM30721 20 Optional
London and Modernity 1880-1960 HIST30102 20 Optional
'A Nation In The Making': India, 1800-1947 HIST30291 20 Optional
Empire, Gender and British Heroes, c.1885 - 2000 HIST30621 20 Optional
Thesis (40 credits) HIST30970 40 Optional
Gender and Sexuality in Modern Africa HIST31001 20 Optional
China & the West: From the Opium War to the Olympic Games HIST31201 20 Optional
Contesting the Supernatural in the Early Modern British Isles, c. 1600-1800 HIST31292 20 Optional
Sex, Drugs and Shopping: Readdressing Inter-war Britain HIST31341 20 Optional
'First Modern Economy' and 'First Industrial Nation': The Netherlands, England, c.1600-1850 HIST31382 20 Optional
The Great Irish Famine and Its Impact, 1845-1900 HIST31451 20 Optional
The Comparative and Transnational History of Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany HIST31521 20 Optional
John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, and U.S. Foreign Policy in the 1960s HIST31551 20 Optional
Defining the Deviant: Crime and British Society, 1888-2000 HIST31591 20 Optional
Christ's Knights: Hospitallers and Templars in the Latin East and Beyond HIST31621 20 Optional
The Aftermath of War in France, Britain and Germany: Violence and Reconstruction after WW1 and WW2 HIST31671 20 Optional
Capital and Commodities in Victorian Britain: an Economic and Social History HIST31701 20 Optional
Fire, Famine and Flood: An Environmental History of England, 1500-1800 HIST31712 20 Optional
The Black Freedom Movement, 1955-1975 HIST31751 20 Optional
Savagery and Civilisation: Early European Encounters with the New World, c. 1492-1628 HIST31782 20 Optional
War, Memory and Politics of Commemoration in Eastern Europe HIST31842 20 Optional
Seaborne State? Venice and the East 1150-1550 HIST31861 20 Optional
Culture in Ottoman Society, ca. 1300-1800 HIST31871 20 Optional
Material Encounters in the Early Modern World, 1400-1800 HIST31881 20 Optional
'Brains and Numbers': Intellectual Life in Victorian Britain HIST31891 20 Optional
Caste Politics in Twentieth Century India HIST31911 20 Optional
From Imperial Encounters to Soviet Frontiers: Migration, Displacement and Diaspora in the Caucasus HIST31922 20 Optional
Becoming Christian in The Early Middle Ages HIST31952 20 Optional
The Normans between Islam and Byzantium: multicultural encounters in the Mediterranean World HIST31991 20 Optional
Establishing Empire: The English Atlantic World, 1585-1655 HIST32002 20 Optional
Curating War and Human Rights: methods in cultural and public history HIST32011 20 Optional
Responses to Globalisation, 1450-1650 HIST32021 20 Optional
The Practice of the Past: Public History, Heritage and Museums HIST32032 20 Optional
Madness and Society HSTM30832 10 Optional
The Nuclear Age HSTM31212 10 Optional
The Nuclear Age HSTM31712 20 Optional
From Sherlock Holmes to CSI: a history of forensic medicine HSTM32011 10 Optional
From Sherlock Holmes to CSI: a history of forensic medicine HSTM32511 20 Optional
Climate Change & Society HSTM33201 10 Optional
Climate Change & Society HSTM33501 20 Optional
Madness and Society HSTM40332 20 Optional
Beyond the Text: The Book and its Body ITAL30432 20 Optional
Bodies, Sex and Gender in Japan JAPA33071 20 Optional
Tools and Techniques for Enterprise MCEL30001 10 Optional
Tools & Techniques for Enterprise MCEL30002 10 Optional
Enterprise Feasibility MCEL30052 10 Optional
Historical controversies in the Study of Israel/Palestine MEST30722 20 Optional
Culture, Media and Politics in the Soviet Union and post-Soviet Russia RUSS30601 20 Optional
Sociology of Human Animal Relations SOCY30042 20 Optional
Urban Sociology SOCY30061 20 Optional
Housing & Home SOCY30122 20 Optional
Body and Society SOCY30141 20 Optional
Secrets, Lies & Mass Deception SOCY30152 20 Optional
Sociology of Cultural Participation and Cultural Policy SOCY30181 20 Optional
Material Culture: The Social Life of Things SOCY30191 20 Optional
A Sense of Inequality: Everyday Understandings of Inequality SOCY30241 20 Optional
Alternative Economies - Ordinary Economies SOCY30252 20 Optional
Multicultural Britain SOCY30272 20 Optional
Applications of Social Networks SOCY30292 20 Optional
Dissertation B (40 credits) SOCY30930 40 Optional
Theory & Method in Demography SOST30012 20 Optional
Advanced Social Network Analysis SOST30022 20 Optional
Modelling Social Inequality SOST30031 20 Optional
The Politics of Business in Latin America SPLA31092 20 Optional
History of the Spanish Atlantic World: Empire, Trade, War SPLA31151 20 Optional
Displaying 10 of 71 course units for year 3

Facilities

The John Rylands Library

Exclusive access to our internationally significant collections, including:

  • printed primary mediaeval sources;
  • extensive holdings for early-modernists, including approximately 12,500 books printed between 1475 and 1640 (e.g. books by Caxton);
  • special collections including Methodist Archives and Collection; French Revolution Collection; Women's Suffrage Movement Archive; Labour Party Library Collections; other papers of prominent scientists and academics, as well as collections in diplomatic and colonial history.

More details.

Manchester Museum

The UK's leading university museum has more than four million objects spanning millennia, including one of the largest collections of ancient Egyptian artefacts in the UK. Go behind-the-scenes to handle, analyse and interpret rare artefacts, including exclusive material specific to ancient history.

Visit the museum's website

As a student in this historically rich city, you'll also have the opportunity to draw on the abundant library, archive and museum holdings of the local area, including Chetham's Library, The Museum of Science and Industry, The People's History Museum and the Working Class Movement Library.

The University of Manchester owns the Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester Museum and Tabley House, giving you unique access to outstanding cultural and historical resources.

Visit our facilities page to find out more.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants from the Disability Support Office. Email: disability@manchester.ac.uk

Careers

Career opportunities

We are one of the most targeted universities by the nation's top employers.

Studying History at The University of Manchester helps to develop transferable skills including analysis and critical reasoning, perception, judgment, critique, interpretation, and time management.

Our graduates enjoy success in a wide range of careers, which reflects the high regard in which employers hold a History degree from Manchester.

Employers include the BBC, KPMG, Deloitte, Marks and Spencer, Aviva, Accenture, and Barclays.

Professions include teaching and academia, heritage and museums, the civil service, policy and think tanks, media and journalism, marketing and public relations, and law and accountancy.

A degree in Sociology gives you the skills and knowledge that you need to able to succeed in the future.

Graduates from Sociology are highly sought after and are able to use their skills and knowledge in a wide range of different areas.

At Manchester we embed a course on Professional Development for Sociologists (ProD) that runs across all three years of the degree.

The course involves lectures, workshops, panels and other activities all designed to help with your studies and equip you for the world of work.

Academic skills courses include training in critical reading and writing, essay and exam techniques, presentation skills, and preparing dissertations. Careers skills courses include regular events on jobs, careers and employability, volunteering and internship opportunities, and opportunities to meet alumni from the Sociology department, graduate employers, Careers Service advisers and other experts at the University.

Some of our most recent graduates are now working at the Ministry of Justice, the NHS, the British Council, Fujitsu, United Nations Refugee Agency, AMNET Media, and Unilever.

For more information, see Careers and employability .