BA Criminology

Year of entry: 2019

Overview

Degree awarded
Bachelor of Arts (BA)
Duration
3 or 4 years
Typical A-level offer
ABB
Typical contextual A-level offer (what is this?)

BBB

Typical International Baccalaureate offer

34 points overall.  6,5,5 in Higher Level subjects.

We welcome all subjects from Arts, Humanities, Mathematics & Science. However, we do not accept General Studies or Critical Thinking.

Full entry requirements

How to apply
Apply through UCAS

Course overview

  • Gain knowledge from our close links with agencies and professionals in the field of criminal justice.
  • Work closely with our interdisciplinary team, with specialisms across sociology, psychology, law, social work and probation practice.
  • Take seminars in a local prison and study alongside prison-based students.
  • Participate in field trips to criminal justice-related locations, including Manchester Crown Court or complete a professional placement on a four-year optional course.
  • Study at a top ten UK university for Law (Times Higher Education World University Rankings 2019).
  • Study a course with excellent student satisfaction (91% of students are satisfied with their experience, NSS 2019).
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Fees

Tuition fees for home/EU students commencing their studies in September 2019 will be £9,250 per annum. Tuition fees for international students will be £18,500 per annum. For general information please see the undergraduate finance pages.

Policy on additional costs

All students should normally be able to complete their programme of study without incurring additional study costs over and above the tuition fee for that programme. Any unavoidable additional compulsory costs totalling more than 1% of the annual home undergraduate fee per annum, regardless of whether the programme in question is undergraduate or postgraduate taught, will be made clear to you at the point of application. Further information can be found in the University's Policy on additional costs incurred by students on undergraduate and postgraduate taught programmes (PDF document, 91KB).

Contact details

School/Faculty
School of Law
Telephone
+44 (0)161 306 1271
Email
Website
http://www.law.manchester.ac.uk/
School/Faculty overview
See: About Us .

Courses in related subject areas

Use the links below to view lists of courses in related subject areas.

Compare this course

Entry requirements

A-level

Grades ABB. Two AS levels are not accepted in place of one A Level.

We welcome all subjects from Arts, Humanities, Mathematics & Science. However, we do not accept General Studies or Critical Thinking.

Duration of A-level study

If you either sat your examinations early or followed an accelerated curriculum and spent three years studying A-levels where the examinations were taken over two years, your application will be considered against the standard selection process of your chosen course. If you have studied an advanced curriculum where the examinations are spread over three years, consideration for an offer will be at the discretion of the admissions tutor.

AS-level

AS level results are not considered as part of the standard admissions process at The University of Manchester.

Unit grade information

The University of Manchester welcomes the provision of unit information where available.  Like all other information provided by applicants this may be taken into consideration when assessing your application.  Unit grades will not normally form part of an offer conditions.

GCSE

We would normally expect to see a good GCSE profile with minimum grades across all subjects of A*/8 to C/4.

International Baccalaureate

34 points overall.  6,5,5 in Higher Level subjects.

We welcome all subjects from Arts, Humanities, Mathematics & Science. However, we do not accept General Studies or Critical Thinking.

Scottish requirements

We normally require Advanced Higher grades of BCC or BC and additional Highers. We welcome all subjects from Arts, Humanities, Mathematics & Science.

English Language and Mathematics not taken at Higher/Advanced Higher must have been achieved at SCQF level 5 (minimum National 5 grade C / Intermediate 2 grade C / Standard Grade Credit level grade 3).

If you require further clarification about the acceptability of this qualification please contact the Academic School(s) you plan to apply to.

Welsh Baccalaureate

The University welcomes and recognises the value of the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma/Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate and usually requires two A Levels or equivalent to be included within this.

We require minimum grade  A from the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma/Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate and BB from 2 A levels.

OR

A minimum grade  B from the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma/Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate and AB from 2 A levels.

We welcome all subjects from Arts, Humanities, Mathematics & Science, including Law. However, we do not accept General Studies or Critical Thinking.

If you require further clarification about the acceptability of this qualification please contact the academic School(s) you plan to apply to.

European Baccalaureate

The University of Manchester welcomes applicants with the European Baccalaureate. Acceptable on its own or in combination with other qualifications, applications from students studying for this qualification are welcome and all applicants will be considered on an individual basis.

We normally require a minimum of   80% overall including a minimum of 8 in English.

AQA Baccalaureate

The University recognises the benefits of the AQA Baccalaureate and the opportunities it provides for applicants to develop independent study and research skills.

In making offers, the University will focus on the three A Levels taken within the AQA Baccalaureate. Students need to check the standard A Level requirements for their chosen course.

The units of broader study, enrichment activities and the Extended Project are considered to be valuable elements of the AQA Baccalaureate and we would therefore strongly encourage students to draw upon these experiences within their personal statement.

Other international entry requirements

We accept a range of qualifications from different countries. For these and general requirements including English language see Accepted entry qualifications from your country

Foundation year

The University recognises a number of foundation programmes as suitable for entry to this undergraduate programme:

Applicants completing the INTO Manchester in partnership with The University of Manchester international foundation programme in Humanities or Business are required to achieve grades ABB and an EAP score of A.

Applicants completing the NCUK International Foundation year in Humanities or Business are required to achieve grades ABB and an EAP score of A.

Applicants studying other Foundation programmes can find information here:

https://www.law.manchester.ac.uk/study/international-applicants/foundation-programmes/  

Alternatively, please contact the academic School to check if your qualification is recognised for entry to this programme and for specific entry requirements.

Pearson BTEC qualifications

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma

We consider the National Extended Diploma for entry, the BTEC subject will be taken into consideration when making a decision. Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full National Extended Diploma with grades  Distinction, Distinction, Merit.  

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma

We consider the National Diploma for entry, the BTEC subject will be taken into consideration when making a decision. Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full National Diploma with grades  Distinction, Merit  plus an additional level 3 qualification such as an A Level at grade  A  or the full National Diploma with grades  Distinction, Distinction  plus an A Level at grade  B

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Foundation Diploma

We consider the National Foundation Diploma for entry, the BTEC subject will be taken into consideration when making a decision. Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full National Foundation Diploma with grade  Merit  plus  A Level grades of BB

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate

We consider the National Extended Certificate for entry, the BTEC subject will be taken into consideration when making a decision. Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full National Extended Certificate with grade  Distinction  plus  A Level grades of BB

OCR Cambridge Technical qualifications

Cambridge Level 3 Technical Extended Diploma (CTEC)

We consider the Technical Extended Diploma for entry, the CTEC subject will be taken into consideration when making a decision.  Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full Technical Extended Diploma with grades  Distinction, Distinction, Merit.  

Cambridge Level 3 Technical Diploma (CTEC)

We consider the Technical Diploma for entry, the CTEC subject will be taken into consideration when making a decision. Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full Technical Diploma with grades Distinction, Merit  plus an additional level 3 qualification such as an A Level at grade  A or the full National Diploma with grades Distinction, Distinction plus an A Level at grade B.

Cambridge Level 3 Technical Foundation Diploma (CTEC)

We consider the Technical Foundation Diploma for entry, the CTEC subject will be taken into consideration when making a decision.  Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full Technical Foundation Diploma with grades Merit, Merit plus A Level grades of BB. 

Cambridge Level 3 Technical Extended Certificate (CTEC)

We consider the Technical Extended Certificate for entry, the CTEC subject will be taken into consideration when making a decision.  Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full Technical Foundation Diploma with grades Distinction plus A Level grades of BB. 

Access to HE Diploma

We require a QAA-recognised humanities Access to HE Diploma with a minimum of 30 credits at distinction and 15 credits at Merit. If you do not have GCSE English Language and Maths at grade C or above we will additionally require 15 credits at level 2, including English Language and Maths.

Cambridge Pre-U

We consider applicants offering Pre-U Principal Subjects, or a mix of Pre-U and A Level subjects, provided a minimum of three distinct subjects overall is taken and we require grades of M2, M1, M1 from 3 Principal Subjects.

We welcome all subjects from Arts, Humanities, Mathematics & Science. However, we do not accept Global Perspectives and Research, General Studies or Critical Thinking.

Extended Project Qualification (EPQ)

The University recognises the benefits of the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) and the opportunities it provides for applicants to develop independent study and research skills. Although the Extended Project will not be included in the conditions of your offer, we strongly encourage you to provide information about the EPQ in your personal statement and at interview. A number of our academic Schools may also choose to take your performance in the EPQ into account should places be available in August for applicants who narrowly miss the entry grades for their chosen course.

Core Maths

The University welcomes and recognises the value of Level 3 core mathematics qualifications (e.g. AQA Certificate in Mathematical Studies). 

Core Mathematics is not a compulsory element of post-16 study and as a result we will not normally include it in the conditions of any offer made to the student. However, if a student chooses to undertake a core mathematics qualification this may be taken into account when we consider their application, particularly for certain non-science courses with a distinct mathematical or statistical element.

We advise students to contact the academic School, who will clarify whether their specific portfolio of qualifications is acceptable for entry on to their chosen course.

Home-schooled applicants

If you are a student who has followed a non-standard educational route, e.g. you have been educated at home; your application will be considered against the standard entry criteria of the course for which you are applying. You will be required to demonstrate that you meet the specified academic entry requirements of the course. We will also require a reference from somebody who knows you well enough, in an official capacity, to write about you and your suitability for higher education. If you are a home schooled student and would like further information or advice please contact the academic School for your chosen course who will be able to help you. 

Non-standard educational routes

Mature students are some of our most well-equipped learners, bringing skills and attributes gained from work, family and other life experiences.  Students come from a whole array of backgrounds, study every kind of course, undertake full-time and part-time learning and are motivated by career intentions as well as personal interest.  There is no such thing as a typical mature student at Manchester.  The application process is the same as for other prospective undergraduates.  If you require further clarification about the acceptability of the qualifications you hold please contact the academic School(s) you plan to apply to.  Further information for mature students can be found here ( http://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/mature-students/ )

English language

All applicants to the University (from the UK and Overseas) are required to show evidence of English Language proficiency.  The minimum English Language requirement for this course is either:
  • IELTS 7 with a minimum of 6.5 in each subtest 
  • An acceptable equivalent qualification.

The UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) requires that every student from outside the UK and the EU must show evidence of a minimum level of English Language in order to be granted a UK visa (Tier 4 visa) to study at undergraduate or postgraduate level. This level is often referred to as the 'B2 level'.

Additionally, our individual Schools may ask for specific English Language proficiency levels that are necessary for their academic programmes. In most cases these requirements are likely to be higher than the B2 level. Further information about our English Language policy, including a list of some of the English Language qualifications we accept, can be found  here .

English language test validity

Some English Language test results are only valid for two years. Your English Language test report must be valid on the start date of the course.

Application and selection

How to apply

Apply through UCAS

Advice to applicants

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Dr Rose Broad offers advice on preparing and submitting your application.

Any exceptional circumstances (e.g. illness prior, ongoing or at the time of your exams) surrounding your application should be included in your personal statement and backed up in your academic reference or the School of Law should be informed in writing prior to your examination results.

How your application is considered

Your UCAS application is always considered as a whole; taking into account your qualifications, personal statement and reference. 

We consider the Widening Participation status of applicants while assessing applications; borderline candidates holding a WP or WP Plus flag are given further consideration.

Potential applicants are welcome to contact the School of Law Admissions Office to discuss their eligibility.

Deferrals

Applications for deferred entry are normally considered. The admissions tutor will be looking for valid reasons for deferral (e.g. financial, relevant work experience, charity work).

Policy for applicants who resit their qualifications

If you have re-sat individual modules to improve your grades, we will consider your application according to the standard selection process. If you are planning to re-sit the final Year 13 examinations, or have already done so, the University will consider your application, but we may require further information in order to make an informed judgment on your application.

Re-applications

If you applied in the previous year and your application was not successful you may apply again. Your application will be considered against the standard course entry criteria for that year of entry.  In your new application you should demonstrate how your application has improved.  We may draw upon all information from your previous applications or any previous registrations at the University as a student when assessing your suitability for your chosen course.If you are applying for a place for the same year of entry through UCAS Extra, you should provide additional evidence of your suitability for the course. If you are applying through clearing you are required to meet the clearing requirements. In both UCAS Extra and clearing the places will be subject to availability.

Transfers

We do not consider applications for the second or third year of the course.  

No credit will be given for prior learning.

Course details

Course description

Karen Kei Ching Ho

Choosing to study criminology at The University of Manchester was easy because it has a great location and high employment rate for graduates.

It also contains a broad range of research material for students and the course content is slightly different from other universities which focus on different aspects of the criminal justice system.

Karen Kei Ching Ho / BA Criminology

Our BA Criminology course will enable you to understand why crime has become a dominant social problem, and how crime and criminal behaviour are related to other social issues.

While gaining a real insight into how criminological knowledge is applied in a variety of sectors, you will learn how we can best research the challenges that face the criminal justice system.

Understanding the causes and consequences of crime will enable you to contribute to discussions about how some of these problems might be remedied.

Under the guidance of our extensive team of criminology experts, you will develop the necessary analytical skills to assess complex data related to experiences of criminality.

You will also have the opportunity to take part in field trips and discussions with professionals to gain a real insight into how criminological knowledge is applied in a variety of sectors.

Studying a specialised degree in Criminology will enable you to develop skills relevant to a variety of key professions concerned with criminal justice and crime reduction, including the police, prisons, offender management, youth justice and victimisation.

Aims

We will provide you with the breadth, depth and knowledge to understanding criminology and related disciplines at an appropriate to a first degree qualification.

By studying this course you will gain an understanding of criminality and the institutions of criminal justice within their social, economic and political context and seeks to promote an appreciation of the role of justice and the 'rule of law' in the criminal justice system.

We provide you with the opportunity to develop specialised knowledge and skills in certain areas of criminology and socio-legal studies. An important feature of the Manchester single honours course is the emphasis on understanding data analysis and research methodologies (qualitative and quantitative) - together with how theory, research and practice can combine effectively.

Special features

Hannah Watts

In Year 2, I was fortunate enough to take part in a Q-Step internship at the Home Office in London.

I had an eight-week paid placement where I worked on current projects around domestic homicides, child sexual abuse and cyber bullying. This really opened my eyes to the importance of social research and the influence this can have on policy.

Hannah Watts / MRes Criminology student and BA Criminology graduate

Learning Criminology Inside

Learning Criminology Inside enables you to take your weekly seminars in a local prison to study a final year option alongside prison-based students. 

Paid placement opportunities

  • Apply for a paid Q-Step internship during the summer between Years 2 and 3. This is an excellent opportunity to gain work experience and make future contacts. Recent placements included the Home Office, Ministry of Justice, and the College of Policing.

Subject to you meeting course requirements, you also have the option of extending your studies and boosting your employability through a paid professional placement year.

Connect with like-minded students

Benefit from networking and professional development opportunities through our student societies

Study abroad

You can apply to  study abroad between Years 2 and 3, gaining experience of another culture and valuable connections.

Teaching and learning

Formal based contact hours consisting of lectures and seminars, amount to between 10 and 12 hours per week. You will to spend in the region of 40 hours per week studying inclusive of lectures and seminars.

Lectures are delivered to a large cohort of students, covering an overview of a particular subject. Seminars are small groups of up to 12 students and an academic member of staff. You will discuss and present aspects of a legal topic which you are learning. You are expected to prepare in advance for the discussion and you are also required to submit written work for each subject.

We also offer skills sessions throughout the year, working in conjunction with local and international lawyers and our Careers Service to enhance our students' academic learning progress and employability. 

If you take the study abroad route, you will complete course units in your host university, taught in English, which may focus on Criminology subjects, or include other topics of interest.

In addition, weekly in-sessional classes are offered to help students with English research and essay-writing skills.

Find out more about teaching and learning

Coursework and assessment

Methods of assessing your work are as varied as the teaching methods we use.

In addition to the usual exams and essays, some of your work will be assessed through oral presentations, short exercises or written pieces such as book reviews, and project work.

We are keen that learning also takes place through the detailed feedback we give you when assessing your work. You will get constructive comments, criticism, and suggestions for improvement on all your written and oral work.

In this way, we hope to make the process of learning a positive and enjoyable process.

Course content for year 1

Common compulsory course units allow you to develop an understanding of the sociological and psychological explanations for crime and criminal behaviour. Study the criminal justice system and criminal law alongside the theories of social behaviour.

Course units for year 1

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optional
Crime and Society LAWS10001 20 Mandatory
Criminological Research Methods LAWS10072 20 Mandatory
Criminal Law (Criminology) LAWS10082 20 Mandatory
Foundations of Criminal Justice LAWS10421 20 Mandatory
Psychology, Crime and Criminal Justice LAWS10432 20 Mandatory
Enhanced Study Skills for Criminology LAWS10441 20 Mandatory

Course content for year 2

Extend your understanding of criminological theory and your knowledge of the practices and techniques used in contemporary criminal justice systems. Develop your knowledge of specific patterns of crime and criminality, as well as your understanding of quantitative and qualitative research methods.

Course units for year 2

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optional
Policing and the Police LAWS20051 20 Mandatory
Explaining Crime and Deviance LAWS20412 20 Mandatory
Making Sense of Criminological Data LAWS20441 20 Mandatory
Modelling Criminological Data LAWS20452 20 Mandatory
Understanding Punishment LAWS20692 20 Mandatory
Criminology and Criminal Justice in Action LAWS20701 20 Optional
Youth, Crime and Justice LAWS31101 20 Optional

Course content for year 3

In Year 3, you will develop your knowledge of current research issues in selected areas of crime and criminal justice, together with a further understanding and appreciation of the inter-relationships between crime, law, criminal justice, and society.

The final year also allows you the opportunity to develop specialised knowledge in particular areas of criminology and/or law. A range of specialist options is available on a wide range of criminological topics.

A key element of final year work is the opportunity to undertake a short or long dissertation. The dissertation allows you to develop an extended piece of writing on a research topic that really interests you; perhaps doing fieldwork and then analysing and making sense of the data that you have collected. You will be supported by experienced academic staff.

Course content for year 4

If completing a year professional placement, you will take the Year 3 course content in Year 4.

Course units for year 4

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optional
Jurisprudence LAWS20101 20 Optional
Crime, Law and History LAWS20242 20 Optional
Criminal Evidence LAWS30082 20 Optional
Human Rights LAWS30091 20 Optional
Drugs and Society LAWS30601 20 Optional
Long Dissertation LAWS30610 40 Optional
Short Dissertation LAWS30620 20 Optional
Comparative Studies in Crime and Criminal Justice LAWS30641 20 Optional
From Imprisonment to Rehabilitation LAWS30661 20 Optional
Sociology of Law LAWS30681 20 Optional
Victims, Crime and Justice LAWS30792 20 Optional
Serious and Organised Crime LAWS30811 20 Optional
Criminology and Mass Violence LAWS31052 20 Optional
Miscarriages of Justice LAWS31062 20 Optional
Law, Gender and Sexuality LAWS31091 20 Optional
Youth, Crime and Justice LAWS31101 20 Optional
Personality Disorder and Crime LAWS31172 20 Optional
Displaying 10 of 17 course units for year 4

Scholarships and bursaries

The School is offering a number of awards for students applying for undergraduate study. To find out more please visit our  Manchester Law Scholars Awards 2019 page .

What our students say

Read profiles of our students to find out about their experiences of studying at Manchester.

Facilities

While you study with the School of Law you will have access to first-class facilities to interact, work and practice your skills. Both Law and Criminology students can volunteer in the working in the award winning Legal Advice Centre

Here, you can work on real legal cases with solicitors and barristers, to refine your practical application of law.

Volunteering in our Miscarriages of Justice Review Centre enables you to work to support clients' claims of innocence, giving you the practical insight you need, to start your career. Working alongside legal experts, you will gain access and review real case files. This unique first-hand experience of this area of criminal justice allows you to connect and engage with experienced practicing lawyers.

Find out more on the Facilities page.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: dass@manchester.ac.uk

Careers

Career opportunities

Criminology is a diverse and fascinating subject, and the transferable skills you develop during your time with us will set you up for a number of paths you may not even have considered.

Recent graduates have gone on to work in areas such as criminal justice system-related professions, police and offender management (eg Probation Service), community justice, national intelligence and security agencies, charity and voluntary sector organisations, government and teaching.

Our BA Criminology programme has employability skills embedded throughout, and you will have access to our specialist careers and employability programme with regular workshops run by careers events throughout your degree. These sessions cover careers ranging across a broad range of professions, and the opportunity to network with our previous graduates.

If you plan to pursue a career in Criminology and areas related to criminal justice, our BA Criminology programme also hosts tailor-made sessions including Criminology Question Time, which gives you the chance to learn from and network with panellists from the police, probation, intelligence analysing and the third sector.

Find out more about careers and employability support at Manchester and criminology-related careers