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BA Film Studies and Middle Eastern Studies

Year of entry: 2019

Overview

Degree awarded
Bachelor of Arts with Honours
Duration
33 months
Typical A-level offer
ABB
Typical contextual A-level offer (what is this?)
Grades BBB including an essay-based subject (such as English Literature, History or Politics).
Typical International Baccalaureate offer

Equivalents to A-level grades are as follows:

A*AA: 37 points overall, with 7,6,6 in Higher Level subjects.

AAA:  36 points overall, with 6,6,6 in Higher Level subjects.

AAB:  35 points overall, with 6,6,5 in Higher Level subjects.

ABB:  34 points overall, with 6,5,5 in Higher Level subjects.

NOTE: please check A-Levels for subject requirements.

Full entry requirements

How to apply
Apply through UCAS

Course overview

  • Expand your experience of film through course units and screenings that focus on both classical and contemporary films, and mainstream and non-mainstream cinema.
  • Study at a top 10 UK university for Middle Eastern and African Studies (Complete University Guide 2019).
  • Gain an in-depth understanding of a large region that is of central importance in the contemporary world, taking an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the Middle East with a course that can be tailored to your needs.

Fees

Tuition fees for home/EU students commencing their studies in September 2019 will be £9,250 per annum. Tuition fees for international students will be £18,500 per annum. For general information please see the undergraduate finance pages.

Policy on additional costs

All students should normally be able to complete their programme of study without incurring additional study costs over and above the tuition fee for that programme. Any unavoidable additional compulsory costs totalling more than 1% of the annual home undergraduate fee per annum, regardless of whether the programme in question is undergraduate or postgraduate taught, will be made clear to you at the point of application. Further information can be found in the University's Policy on additional costs incurred by students on undergraduate and postgraduate taught programmes (PDF document, 91KB).

Contact details

School/Faculty
School of Arts, Languages and Cultures
Contact name
Nicola Runciman
Telephone
+44 (0)161 275 8129
Email
Website
http://www.alc.manchester.ac.uk/subjects/drama/
School/Faculty overview

See: About us

Courses in related subject areas

Use the links below to view lists of courses in related subject areas.

Compare this course

Entry requirements

A-level

ABB including an essay-based subject (such as English Literature, History or Politics).

AS-level

AS level results are not considered as part of the standard admissions process at The University of Manchester.

Unit grade information

The University of Manchester welcomes the provision of unit information where available.  Like all other information provided by applicants this may be taken into consideration when assessing your application.  Unit grades will not normally form part of an offer conditions.

GCSE

Applicants must demonstrate a broad general education including acceptable levels of Literacy and Numeracy, equivalent to at least Grade C or 4 in GCSE English Language and Mathematics (note that some degree programmes may require a higher grade than this - please see individual programme requirements). GCSE English Literature will not be accepted in lieu of GCSE English Language.

International Baccalaureate

Equivalents to A-level grades are as follows:

A*AA: 37 points overall, with 7,6,6 in Higher Level subjects.

AAA:  36 points overall, with 6,6,6 in Higher Level subjects.

AAB:  35 points overall, with 6,6,5 in Higher Level subjects.

ABB:  34 points overall, with 6,5,5 in Higher Level subjects.

NOTE: please check A-Levels for subject requirements.

Scottish requirements

Before reading this, please consult the A-level requirements for this programme and note any subject requirements.

For applicants who have studied under the new Scottish qualification system, the following will apply.

For programmes which have no particular pre-requisite subject , we require (in all cases, at least three Highers should be achieved by the end of S5):

  • A*AA at A-level :  Hrs of AAAAAB or AAAB plus Adv Hr Gr A
  • AAA at A-level   :  Hrs of AAAABB or AABB plus Adv Hr Gr A
  • AAB at A-level   :  Hrs of AAABBB or ABBB plus Adv Hr Gr A
  • ABB at A-level   :  Hrs of AAABBB or ABBB plus Adv Hr at min. Gr B

Where pre-requisite subjects are cited in our A-level requirements , we require (in all cases, at least three Highers should be achieved by the end of S5 AND Grade A should be achieved at Adv Hr in the required subject):

  • A*AA at A-level : Hrs of AAA plus either two Adv Hrs at Grs. AA, or one Adv Hr and two Hrs at Grs. AA
  • AAA at A-level   : Hrs of AAB plus either two Adv Hrs at Grs. AA, or one Adv Hr and two Hrs at Grs. AA
  • AAB at A-level   : Hrs of ABB plus either two Adv Hrs at Grs. AB, or one Adv Hr and two Hrs at Grs. AB
  • ABB at A-level   : Hrs of BBB plus either two Adv Hrs at Grs. AB, or one Adv Hr and two Hrs at Grs. AB

For applicants who have studied under the old Scottish qualification system , Highers are welcomed but will not be accepted alone.  The minimum requirement is three Advanced Highers, the grades of which will be the same as our stated A-level grades for the course in question.  Any subjects (or other qualifications) required for A-level will also be required for the Advanced Highers, at the equivalent grade.

All applicants must have achieved National 5 English at Grade B.

Welsh Baccalaureate

The University welcomes and recognises the value of the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma/Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate and usually requires two A Levels or equivalent to be included within this.

The minimum grade required will normally be the same as the lowest grade listed in the A Level entry requirements.

If you require further clarification about the acceptability of this qualification please contact the academic School(s) you plan to apply to.

European Baccalaureate

77% to include a minimum of 8.0 in the required subject (see A-level requirements for these).

AQA Baccalaureate

The University recognises the benefits of the AQA Baccalaureate and the opportunities it provides for applicants to develop independent study and research skills.

In making offers, the University will focus on the three A Levels taken within the AQA Baccalaureate. Students need to check the standard A Level requirements for their chosen course.

The units of broader study, enrichment activities and the Extended Project are considered to be valuable elements of the AQA Baccalaureate and we would therefore strongly encourage students to draw upon these experiences within their personal statement.

Other international entry requirements

We accept a range of qualifications from different countries. For these and general requirements including English language see Accepted entry qualifications from your country

Pearson BTEC qualifications

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma: we require at Distinction / Distinction / Merit.

BTEC Level 3 National Diploma: we require Distinction / Distinction, plus one A-level at Grade B in the required subject (see A-level requirements for these).

BTEC Level 3 National Foundation Diploma: we require Distinction plus an A-level at min. Grade B in  the required subject (see A-level requirements for these), plus an EPQ or AS at Grade B.

BTEC National Extended Certificate: we require a Distinction, plus two A-levels at Grades BB (which must include  the required subject - see A-level requirements for these).

OCR Cambridge Technical qualifications

Cambridge Level 3 Technical Extended Diploma (CTEC): We consider the Technical Extended Diploma for entry.  Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full Technical Extended Diploma with grades DDM.

Cambridge Level 3 Technical Diploma (CTEC): Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full Technical Diploma with grades DM plus an A Level at grade A in the required subject (see A-level requirements for these).

Cambridge Level 3 Technical Foundation Diploma (CTEC): Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full Technical Foundation Diploma with grades DD plus an A-level at min. Grade B in the required subject (see A-level requirements for these), plus an EPQ or AS at Grade B.

Cambridge Level 3 Technical Extended Certificate (CTEC): Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full Tech Ext Cert Grade D plus two A-levels at Grades BB (which must include the required subject - see A-level requirements for these).

Access to HE Diploma

Overall 60 credits are required with 45 at Level 3.  Applicants must also have EITHER GCSEs in both English and Mathematics (at Grade B/6 or higher), OR must demonstrate achievement at Level 2 (GCSE-equivalent) by, for example, having 6 credits each in English and Maths.  We also consider other factors such as additional educational achievements, life experience and skills on an individual basis.

Please read the A-level entry requirements for this programme and then look at the relevant set of Access requirements:

For programmes requiring A*AA and AAA: a minimum of 45 credits with a Distinction grade in a Humanities-related subject.  15 of these credits must be in the pre-requisite subject required for A-levels.

For programmes requiring AAB: a minimum of 39 credits with a Distinction grade, plus 6 credits with a Merit grade, all in a Humanities-related subject. 15 of the Distinction credits should be in the pre-requisite subject required for A-levels.

For programmes requiring ABB: a minimum of 30 credits with a Distinction grade, plus 15 credits with a Merit grade, all in a Humanities-related subject. 15 of the Distinction credits should be in the pre-requisite subject required for A-levels.

If you are applying to a programme involving History: all Access applicants will be required to produce a piece of written work, for assessment by the Admissions Tutor. Once you have applied, the Admissions Administrator will contact you with a list of topics/questions. You will be asked to choose one and produce a piece (1500 words) on that subject, for submission by the deadline given by the Administrator.

If you are applying to a programme involving one Language: you must also EITHER have GCSE Grade C/4 or higher in English Language or any Language, OR be able to demonstrate achievement at Level 2 (GCSE-equivalent) by, for example, having 6 credits in English Language or any Language at Level 2.

If you are applying to a programme involving two Languages : Applicants cannot begin both languages at beginners' level; they must already have an A-level or equivalent in one of the two Languages to be studied, as well as the Access qualification.

Cambridge Pre-U

We consider applicants offering Pre-U Principal Subjects, or a mix of Pre-U and A Level subjects, provided a minimum of three distinct subjects overall is taken.

Please note our A-level requirements for grades and any subject requirements for this programme.  Pre-U equivalencies will be:

  • AAA at A level = Candidates taking Pre-U principal subjects in conjunction with A levels are expected to achieve a combination of D3 in the Pre-U certificates and grade A at A level in three distinct subjects.  
  • AAB at A level = Candidates taking Pre-U principal subjects in conjunction with A levels are expected to achieve a combination of D3, D3, M2 in the Pre-U and AAB at A level in three distinct subjects.  
  • ABB at A level = Candidates taking Pre-U principal subjects in conjunction with A levels are expected to achieve a combination of D3, M2, M2 in the Pre-U and ABB at A level in three distinct subjects.

Extended Project Qualification (EPQ)

The University recognises the benefit of the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) and the opportunities it provides for applicants to develop independent study and research skills. We strongly encourage you to provide information about the EPQ in your personal statement and at interview.

For this programme, as well as the regular conditions of offer, we may make students who are currently taking, or have completed the EPQ, an alternative offer.

For programmes requiring A*AA, we will also make an alternative offer of AAA plus the Extended Project at Grade A.

For programmes requiring AAA, we will also make an alternative offer of AAB plus the Extended Project at Grade A.

For programmes requiring AAB, we will also make an alternative offer of ABB plus the Extended Project at Grade A.

PLEASE NOTE: Where a particular grade is required in a pre-requisite subject, that grade will not be reduced; the reduction will be in another subject.

Core Maths

The University welcomes and recognises the value of Level 3 core mathematics qualifications (e.g. AQA Certificate in Mathematical Studies). 

Core Mathematics is not a compulsory element of post-16 study and as a result we will not normally include it in the conditions of any offer made to the student. However, if a student chooses to undertake a core mathematics qualification this may be taken into account when we consider their application, particularly for certain non-science courses with a distinct mathematical or statistical element.

We advise students to contact the academic School, who will clarify whether their specific portfolio of qualifications is acceptable for entry on to their chosen course.

Home-schooled applicants

If you are a student who has followed a non-standard educational route, e.g. you have been educated at home; your application will be considered against the standard entry criteria of the course for which you are applying. You will be required to demonstrate that you meet the specified academic entry requirements of the course. We will also require a reference from somebody who knows you well enough, in an official capacity, to write about you and your suitability for higher education. If you are a home schooled student and would like further information or advice please contact the academic School for your chosen course who will be able to help you. 

Non-standard educational routes

Mature students are some of our most well-equipped learners, bringing skills and attributes gained from work, family and other life experiences.  Students come from a whole array of backgrounds, study every kind of course, undertake full-time and part-time learning and are motivated by career intentions as well as personal interest.  There is no such thing as a typical mature student at Manchester.  The application process is the same as for other prospective undergraduates.  If you require further clarification about the acceptability of the qualifications you hold please contact the academic School(s) you plan to apply to.  Further information for mature students can be found here ( http://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/mature-students/ )

English language

All applicants to the University (from the UK and Overseas) are required to show evidence of English Language proficiency.  The minimum English Language requirement for this course is either:
  • GCSE English Language grade B /6, or;
  • IELTS 7.0, or;
  • An acceptable equivalent qualification.

The UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) requires that every student from outside the UK and the EU must show evidence of a minimum level of English Language in order to be granted a UK visa (Tier 4 visa) to study at undergraduate or postgraduate level. This level is often referred to as the 'B2 level'.

Additionally, our individual Schools may ask for specific English Language proficiency levels that are necessary for their academic programmes. In most cases these requirements are likely to be higher than the B2 level. Further information about our English Language policy, including a list of some of the English Language qualifications we accept, can be found  here .

English language test validity

Some English Language test results are only valid for two years. Your English Language test report must be valid on the start date of the course.

Application and selection

How to apply

Apply through UCAS

Returning to education

We welcome applications from mature students and will consider them on an individual basis.

Deferrals

We welcome applications for deferred entry and feel a gap year benefits many students.

We do ask applicants to let us know as early as possible if they are intending to defer.  This helps us to adjust the number of offers we make, in order to achieve the required number of students in a given year.

Policy for applicants who resit their qualifications

The University will consider applicants who have re-sat their final examinations but we may require further information in order to make an informed academic judgment on your application.

Re-applications

If you applied in the previous year and your application was not successful you may apply again. Your application will be considered against the standard course entry criteria for that year of entry.  In your new application you should demonstrate how your application has improved.  We may draw upon all information from your previous applications or any previous registrations at the University as a student when assessing your suitability for your chosen course.If you are applying for a place for the same year of entry through UCAS Extra, you should provide additional evidence of your suitability for the course. If you are applying through clearing you are required to meet the clearing requirements. In both UCAS Extra and clearing the places will be subject to availability.

Transfers

We will consider applications to transfer to Manchester from other universities and would normally ask for a letter explaining why a transfer was needed, relevant transcripts, a copy of the applicant's UCAS form and a confidential reference from one of the applicant's current university tutors.

We will consider applications to transfer from other degrees within the University of Manchester but applicants are required to have the A-level grades (or other qualifications) needed for entry to the degree programme for which they are applying.

Both of the above are subject to our having enough places to accommodate such applicants.   Enquiries should be made to the admissions administrator for the subject (see contact details).

Course details

Course description

BA Film Studies and Middle Eastern Studies aims to develop your understanding and awareness of the rich possibilities of this creative medium and encourages you to approach the study of film from a range of historical and theoretical perspectives.

You will also gain an in-depth understanding of the Middle East, a large region that is of central importance in the contemporary world.

Film Studies

You will expand your experience of film through taught units and screenings that focus on both classical and contemporary films, covering a wide range of film cultures from around the world. 

You will study mainstream and non-mainstream films in order to broaden your understanding of the history of film, as well as the debates and issues that are informing and generated by current practice in film and shaping its future.

As you enhance your skills of close analysis, you will also develop an understanding of how film engages with socio-cultural and political concerns, placing the films you study in their historical context as well as thinking about current debates and future challenges for cinema as a medium.

The course emphasises historical and theoretical approaches to studying film rather than practical production. 

Middle Eastern Studies

  • The course takes into account the fact that the study of the Middle East has grown into a multi-disciplinary and cross-cultural academic phenomenon, attracting strong interest for political, cultural and social reasons.
  • It takes on board academic developments in fields such as globalisation, cultural identity, diaspora and migration studies, gender studies, and post-colonial studies, all of which are based on techniques in the analysis of evidence across several Middle Eastern languages, and uses original sources in English translation as well as secondary sources in English.
  • The interplay of disciplines and skills involved in achieving a balanced view of the history, literatures, cultures, and religions of the Middle East is broad and complex.
  • Language skills are useful in achieving an advanced understanding of this balanced view, but not the only route. This degree, therefore, allows the study of language(s) up to level 2, but does not make language study compulsory.
  • The course will equip you, through core course units and a wide range of optional course units, with the ability to acquire a thorough and sufficiently specific, but language-independent understanding of the Middle East, alongside key contemporary methods in the study of culture, religion, literature and history.

Special features

Placement year option

Apply your subject-specific knowledge in a real-world context through a placement year in your third year of study, enabling you to enhance your employment prospects, clarify your career goals and build your external networks.

Connect with likeminded students

Join The University of Manchester Filmmaking Society, which exists to provide a platform for aspiring filmmakers attending the university to meet, exchange ideas and create their own cinematic productions.

The University of Manchester Drama Society is for anyone with an interest in drama, be that acting, directing, writing, filmmaking, costume, set building, stage managing or just watching. One of the largest in the Student Union, the society has links with many of Manchester's award-winning theatrical venues, including the Contact Theatre and the Royal Exchange Theatre. Each summer the society showcases at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival.

Teaching and learning

You will learn through lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical group projects.

There's emphasis on attending film screenings, which are compulsory and designed to enable you to better understand the distinctive qualities of film as a medium.

There's also emphasis on close analysis which is designed to enable you to learn to interpret films and their discursive surround, including relevant paratexts (eg promotional material such as trailers and posters).

You will spend approximately 12 hours a week in formal study sessions. For every hour spent at University, you will be expected to complete a further two to three hours of independent study. You will also need to study during the holiday periods.

The individual study component could be spent reading, producing written work, or revising for examinations.

Coursework and assessment

You will be assessed in various ways, including:

  • written and oral examinations;
  • coursework essays;
  • research reports;
  • practical tests;
  • learning logs;
  • web contributions;
  • small-scale practical assignments;
  • seminar presentations and participation;
  • library research, linguistic fieldwork and data collection.

Many course units are assessed through a mixture of techniques.

In your final year, you can choose to write a dissertation.

Course content for year 1

The Joint Honours in Film Studies provide you with a thorough grounding in film history and key theoretical approaches to studying film as well as the opportunity to develop specialist areas of interest.

In your first year, you will take three compulsory course units that establish the conceptual `building blocks' of studying film as well as providing you with a thorough grounding in major developments in early and classical cinema before progressing into the various `new wave' movements and developments in contemporary cinema.

The Art of Film covers the core concepts and terminology in studying film. The unit addresses the distinctive properties of film as a medium and engages with debates about film's status as an art. Major tendencies in editing and cinematography are explored before the unit focuses on mise-en-scene and shot composition, classical and anti-classical approaches to narrative, major forms of genre, authorship and the role of the director, the importance of music, stars and the process of adaptation.

Introduction to Early and Classical Cinema covers the origins of cinema up to the 1950s. As well as pioneering figures and distinctive movements such as German Expressionism and Surrealist cinema, the course considers key technological innovations in sound and colour.

Introduction to World Cinema covers a range of film cultures from different countries with an initial emphasis on the various `new wave' movements which began to emerge around the world in the 1950s and 1960s. The unit addresses significant post-Second World War developments in the cinema of countries such as France and Japan.

Course units for year 1

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optional
The Art of Film DRAM10031 20 Mandatory
Introduction to Early and Classical Cinema DRAM13331 20 Mandatory
History and Politics of the Middle East and North Africa MEST10711 20 Mandatory
Introduction to World Cinema SALC11002 20 Mandatory
The History and Sociopolitics of Palestine/Israel (1882-1967) MEST10042 20 Optional
Introduction to Islam MEST10061 20 Optional
Cultures of the Middle East and North Africa MEST10092 20 Optional

Course content for year 2

In your second year you take one compulsory unit - Screen, Culture and Society - which covers more advanced theoretical debates about the relationship between film and society. You will be able to select from a range of specialist study options on specific issues in Film Studies and focus on aspects of American, British, Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Russian or Spanish and Portuguese language cinema with a particular interest in questions of identity and representation. How have films perpetuated or subverted notions of gender, sexuality, national identity, ethnicity and class?

Course content for year 3

Your remaining units in your final year are all optional and you can select from a wide range of units covering different countries, genres and issues. You can also choose to write a dissertation.

Facilities

Our comprehensive facilities include the Martin Harris Centre - home to 150-seater The John Thaw Studio and our main `lab' for exploring performance - and workshops and rehearsal rooms fully equipped with state-of-the-art sound-editing and video editing suites. Manchester also has the 2nd highest concentration of theatres in the UK.

Learn more on the Facilities page.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: dass@manchester.ac.uk

Careers

Career opportunities

Study Film Studies at The University of Manchester, and you'll learn to:

  • interpret and critically analyse theatre, performance and film;
  • create original work for live performance and film;
  • develop critical and analytical thinking and writing;
  • demonstrate a high level of transferable skills - especially in interpersonal communication, group work, leadership, creative problem solving, teamwork, presentation and research.

Film Studies graduates enter a broad range of occupations - a fact that underlines their considerable adaptability and aptitude for collaborative work, effective communication and negotiation. These include applied theatre areas, television and radio (often following specialised BBC or ITV training courses/work experience), journalism, teaching, community arts and arts administration, and law and business management.

A degree in Modern Languages and Cultures paves the way for an exceptionally broad range of careers. You will develop intercultural awareness and communication skills - both highly valued by employers.

Studies show that over two-thirds of UK businesses value foreign language skills; through your studies, you'll acquire transferable expertise at the very heart of language learning, including enhanced powers of perception and interpretation and advanced decision-making and multitasking skills.

This will open up numerous paths with an international dimension (eg business and finance). You will also have excellent all-round communication skills, making you a strong contender for openings in the media, PR and similar areas.

Many of our graduates go straight into business services, marketing, advertising, management, banking or communications. Others opt for postgraduate study or further vocational training to become accountants, lawyers, teachers (in the UK or abroad) or enter the Civil Service.

Employers of our recent Middle Eastern Studies graduates include RBS, Foreign and Commonwealth Office, HBOS, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK Islamic Mission, Santander, Royal Society of Arts, Berlitz, Ernst & Young, Hastings Direct, Amnesty International, PwC, Virgin Atlantic, Qatar Airlines, British Army, HSBC, and The British Council.

Find out more on the Careers and employability page.