BA Music and Drama / Course details

Year of entry: 2020

Course unit details:
World Music Ensemble Performance (20 Credits)

Unit code MUSC20650
Credit rating 20
Unit level Level 2
Teaching period(s) Full year
Offered by School of Arts, Languages and Cultures
Available as a free choice unit? No

Overview

This course provides the foundation for Level 2 ensemble performance studies, consisting of both of the following options: 

•          Gamelan Ensemble (max. 16 students)

•          Klezmer Ensemble

Aims

  • To expand upon skills already established in MUSC 10600 by confronting performance contexts involving collaboration with other musicians.
  • To facilitate the development of students’ creative imagination and skills of critical self-awareness when working in a collaborative performance context.
  • To learn about music from other cultures through performance.

Syllabus

 

Gamelan

This option provides a practical and theoretical introduction to the music of the gamelan degung, a small gong-chime orchestra indigenous to the Sundanese people of West Java, Indonesia. The main focus is the study of traditional performance practices and students will learn both traditional and contemporary repertoire. They will also develop skills in improvisation and group composition. In addition to their practical study of repertoire, tuning systems, structural forms and notation, students are encouraged to undertake background reading and to listen to a broad repertoire of music from Java and Bali. They will attend weekly practical sessions and prepare a final performance programme.

 

On completion of the Gamelan option, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a practical and theoretical understanding of the structural forms used in gamelan degung
  • Use Sundanese cipher notation to read and transcribe melodic material
  • Perform a selection of traditional and new repertoire from memory
  • Demonstrate the ability to work both individually and in collaborative teams
  • Demonstrate skills in improvisation and group composition

 

Klezmer

Students will learn to play traditional Klezmer music of predominantly Eastern European origin and will develop skills in improvisation, arrangement and group interpretation. They will undertake recommended background reading and listen to a variety of related repertoire. They will attend weekly practical sessions and prepare a final performance programme.

 

On completion of the Klezmer option, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a practical and theoretical understanding of the structural forms and stylistic conventions used in klezmer music
  • Perform a selection of traditional repertoire from memory
  • Demonstrate the ability to work both individually and in collaborative teams
  • Demonstrate skills in improvisation and arrangement

Teaching and learning methods

Weekly practical sessions: workshops/coaching with tutor; group rehearsal and composition. Occasional individual tasks as set by the course tutor. Occasional film or seminar-style presentation as determined by the course tutor.

Knowledge and understanding

  • Demonstrate increased understanding of how music works and the contexts in which it is performed.
  • Agree on an interpretation or arrangement with other performers, and apply an informed understanding of musical style and structure in order to realise that interpretation.

Intellectual skills

  • Show an enhanced ability to understand and apply analytical skills to music, and convey that understanding to other musicians.
  • Engage with other musicians in meaningful dialogue about music and its interpretation. 

Practical skills

  • Demonstrate enhanced performance abilities in the skill areas cultivated by each of the chosen sub-units.
  • Respond to and collaborate with other musicians whilst performing.

Transferable skills and personal qualities

  • Demonstrate enhanced skills in problem-solving, interpersonal communication, rehearsal techniques and the practical application of analytical and interpretative insights.
  • Demonstrate the confidence and interpersonal skills to work effectively in groups, showing skills relating to teamwork, negotiation, decision-making and leadership.

Employability skills

Analytical skills
¿ Surveying repertoire, analysing and showing understanding of the repertoire you are performing
Innovation/creativity
¿ Initiative in inventing a creative concept and putting it into motion, coming up with your own ideas, and not relying on your teacher to do the thinking for you
Leadership
¿ Being responsible for overseeing a creative product from inception through to final performance
Project management
¿ Developing time-management skills, developing effective and efficient practising habits, setting and achieving goals, collaborating effectively with other musicians as appropriate
Other
¿ Self-awareness: knowing your strengths and skills and having the confidence to put these across through performance; ¿ Willingness to learn: being inquisitive about such issues as repertoire and performance practice, being enthusiastic and open to new ideas, making decisions, assessing progress and making changes if necessary

Assessment methods

 

Assessment task

Length

Weighting within unit

Gamelan

 

 

 

Klezmer

 

A group performance of about 40 mins, usually a lunchtime recital

 

A group performance of about 40 minutes, usually a lunchtime recital

50%

 

 

 

50%

 

 

Feedback methods

Workshops/coaching sessions; group discussion; individual discussion with tutor; reflection on informal performances; written feedback on final assessed performance.

Recommended reading

Each of the components in the course unit has its own reading and listening lists. The following titles provide overall support:

 

Davies, Stephen, Musical Works and Performances: a Philosophical Exploration (Oxford, 2001).

Dunsby, Jonathan, Performing Music: Shared Concerns (Oxford, 1995).

Godlovitch, Stanley, Musical Performance: A Philosophical Study (London and New York, 2003).

Rink, John (ed.), Musical Performance: A Guide to Understanding (Cambridge, 2002).

Rink, John (ed.), The Practice of Performance: Studies in Musical Interpretation (Cambridge, 2005).

Study hours

Independent study hours
Independent study 200

Teaching staff

Staff member Role
Caroline Bithell Unit coordinator

Additional notes

SCHEDULED ACTIVITY HOURS

 

Each option has its own schedule of workshops/coaching sessions and group rehearsals: see course outline for details.

 

Return to course details