BSc Anatomical Sciences / Course details

Year of entry: 2020

Course unit details:
Immune Response & Disease (E)

Unit code BIOL31802
Credit rating 10
Unit level Level 3
Teaching period(s) Semester 2
Offered by School of Biological Sciences
Available as a free choice unit? No

Overview

This Unit builds on the pre-requisite Advanced Immunology Unit (BIOL31371). Having learnt about how the immune system functions to sense and mount appropriate responses to different challenges in a manner so as to protect and maintain a healthy body last semester, you will now look at ways in which this normal function of the immune system can go wrong, why this results in disease and how knowledge of normal and disease mechanisms can be used to inform corrective intervention. The Unit will be organised as themed weeks, with each week dedicated to a different disease situation resulting from inappropriate immunity or immune dysfunction. 

Pre/co-requisites

Unit title Unit code Requirement type Description
Immunology BIOL21242 Pre-Requisite Compulsory
Advanced Immunology (E) BIOL31371 Co-Requisite Compulsory
BIOL21242 is a Pre-requisite of BIOL31802 BIOL31371 is a Co-requisite of BIOL31802

Aims

·                To use knowledge of normal protective immune function to explain processes of disease in named situations involving inappropriate or dysfunctional immunity.

·                To apply knowledge of the process of disease to explain current approaches to clinical intervention in the examples of immune related disease being considered.

·                To consider examples of contemporary experimental approaches aiming to manipulate the immune system in the context of immune related disease for improved therapeutic intervention in the future. 

Learning outcomes

By the end of this Unit you should be able to;

 

·                use your understanding of normal immune function to explain mechanisms of disease in named situations of inappropriate immunity or immune dysfunction studied in the Unit

·                critically evaluate the rationale for current therapeutic intervention in relation to knowledge of immune dysfunction in such situations   

·                discuss, using examples, how knowledge of disease mechanism is informing experimental approaches to improved therapeutic intervention in the future. 

Syllabus

This Unit builds on the pre-requisite Advanced Immunology Unit (BIOL31371). Having learnt about how the immune system functions to sense and mount appropriate responses to different challenges in a manner so as to protect and maintain a healthy body last semester, you will now look at ways in which this normal function of the immune system can go wrong, why this results in disease and how knowledge of normal and disease mechanisms can be used to inform corrective intervention. The Unit will be organised as themed weeks, with each week dedicated to a different disease situation resulting from inappropriate immunity or immune dysfunction.

 

Diseases forming themes in the Unit last year were allergy, autoimmunity (with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis), primary immune deficiency, transplantation, cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. Themes are reviewed regularly to ensure they are reflective of current trends in the field. For each themed week, there will be three 50 minute lectures during which understanding of the underlying mechanism resulting in disease will be established and related both to the basis of current clinical interventions and to examples of how knowledge of normal and perturbed immune function is informing current experimental approaches investigating improved methods of therapeutic intervention in the future.

Employability skills

Group/team working
Group collaboration through discussion on the online community learning forum.
Research
Engaging with primary literature; coursework essay; analysing and discussing scientific concepts.
Written communication
Coursework essay and peer feedback; discussion on the online community learning forum; essay-based summative exam.

Assessment methods

Method Weight
Written exam 95%
Written assignment (inc essay) 5%

Written exam

 Two hour written exam (worth 95% of the Unit mark): 2 essays from a choice of 6

Written course work – 4 page essay and a mark review exercise          Course work learning activity (worth 5% of the Unit mark): Four page essay for formative feedback (worth 4 %) and two self-reflective mark reviews of essays submitted by peers (each worth 0.5 %), justified in relation to the SBS exam marking criteria.

Feedback methods

•       Written formative feedback on the coursework essay plan.

•       Self-reflective feedback during the mark reviews.

•       Online ’Community Learning Forum’, incorporating anonymous submission and discussion, a tag system to target posts to the attention of individual lecturers and regular monitoring by the Unit Coordinator, supported up to the Unit exam.

Recommended reading

Janeway’s Immunobiology, 9th Edition (2017), written by Murphy and Weaver (Garland Scientific).

Kuby Immunology (8th edition, 2018), written by Punt, Stranford, Jones and Owen (MacMillan Education),

Available as an ebook through the University of Manchester library;

Roitt’s Essential Immunology (13th edition, 2017), written by Delves, Martin, Burton and Roitt (Wiley-Blackwell).

Immunology is a fast moving field. Further reviews, original articles and websites will be provided in lectures.

Study hours

Scheduled activity hours
Assessment written exam 2
Lectures 18
Independent study hours
Independent study 62

Teaching staff

Staff member Role
Kathleen Nolan Unit coordinator

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