Clearing and adjustment 2020

Take a look at our vacancies to see if this course, or similar, has spaces available. Join us now and help shape tomorrow.

Search clearing vacancies

BSc Educational Psychology

Year of entry: 2020

Coronavirus information for applicants and offer-holders

For the latest updates on how coronavirus will affect applicants and offer-holders, you can visit our FAQs.

Read our latest coronavirus information

Holding an offer for 2020 entry? Visit our dedicated offer-holders page.

Information for offer-holders

Overview

Degree awarded
Bachelor of Science (BSc)
Duration
3 years
Typical A-level offer
AAB
Typical contextual A-level offer (what is this?)
ABB
Typical International Baccalaureate offer

35 points overall. 6, 6, 5 in higher-level subjects.

Full entry requirements

How to apply
Apply through UCAS .

Course overview

  • We're one of the top 10 Education departments in the UK (Global Ranking of Academic Subjects 2019).
  • Study a course accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS), making you eligible for Chartered Membership of BPS.
  • Explore core areas of psychology, specifically in relation to education.
  • Learn from active researchers, and practicing educational and counselling psychologists.
  • Enhance your employability by undertaking work placements throughout the course.
Loading
Educational Psychology at The University of Manchester

Open days

The University holds regular open days (usually in June, September and October) where you will have the opportunity to tour the campus and find out more about our facilities and courses.

On this day, you will find out more about the School of Environment, Education and Development and our resources, and meet academic and admissions staff who will be able to answer any questions you have.

For more information, see Open days

Fees

Tuition fees for home/EU students commencing their studies in September 2020 will be £9,250 per annum. Tuition fees for international students will be £19,000 per annum. For general information please see the undergraduate finance pages.

Policy on additional costs

All students should normally be able to complete their programme of study without incurring additional study costs over and above the tuition fee for that programme. Any unavoidable additional compulsory costs totalling more than 1% of the annual home undergraduate fee per annum, regardless of whether the programme in question is undergraduate or postgraduate taught, will be made clear to you at the point of application. Further information can be found in the University's Policy on additional costs incurred by students on undergraduate and postgraduate taught programmes (PDF document, 91KB).

Contact details

School/Faculty
School of Environment, Education and Development
Contact name
Recruitment & Admissions Office
Email
Website
http://www.seed.manchester.ac.uk/education
School/Faculty overview
See: The School .

Courses in related subject areas

Use the links below to view lists of courses in related subject areas.

Compare this course

Entry requirements

A-level

AAB

AS-level

AS level results are not considered as part of the standard admissions process at The University of Manchester.

Unit grade information

The University of Manchester welcomes the provision of unit information where available.  Like all other information provided by applicants this may be taken into consideration when assessing your application.  Unit grades will not normally form part of an offer conditions.

GCSE

Applicants must demonstrate a broad general education including acceptable levels of Literacy and Numeracy, equivalent to at least Grade C or 4 in GCSE/iGCSE English Language and Mathematics. GCSE/iGCSE English Literature will not be accepted in lieu of GCSE/iGCSE English Language.

Please note that if you hold English as a second language iGCSE qualification, we may also require you to offer one of our acceptable equivalent English Language qualifications or achieve a higher grade in your iGCSE than the one stated above. Please contact the academic School for clarification.

International Baccalaureate

35 points overall. 6, 6, 5 in higher-level subjects.

Other international entry requirements

We accept a range of qualifications from different countries. For these and general requirements including English language see Accepted entry qualifications from your country

Scottish requirements

We normally require grades AAABC/AABBB in Scottish Highers. 

Applicants presenting a combination of Scottish Highers and Advanced Highers are welcomed and should contact the academic school directly to discuss their portfolio of qualifications. 

English Language and Mathematics not taken at Higher/Advanced Higher must have been achieved at SCQF level 5 (minimum National 5 grade C / Intermediate 2 grade C / Standard Grade Credit level grade 3).

If you require further clarification about the acceptability of this qualification please contact the Academic School(s) you plan to apply to.

Welsh Baccalaureate

The University welcomes and recognises the value of the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma/Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate and usually requires two A Levels or equivalent to be included within this.

We require minimum grade A from the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma/Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate.

If you require further clarification about the acceptability of this qualification please contact the academic School(s) you plan to apply to.

European Baccalaureate

The University of Manchester welcomes applicants with the European Baccalaureate. Acceptable on its own or in combination with other qualifications, applications from students studying for this qualification are welcome and all applicants will be considered on an individual basis.

AQA Baccalaureate

The University recognises the benefits of the AQA Baccalaureate and the opportunities it provides for applicants to develop independent study and research skills.

In making offers, the University will focus on the three A Levels taken within the AQA Baccalaureate. Students need to check the standard A Level requirements for their chosen course.

The units of broader study, enrichment activities and the Extended Project are considered to be valuable elements of the AQA Baccalaureate and we would therefore strongly encourage students to draw upon these experiences within their personal statement.

Foundation year

The University recognises a number of foundation programmes as suitable for entry to this undergraduate programme:

Applicants completing the INTO Manchester in partnership with The University of Manchester international foundation programme are required to achieve  AAB and an EAP score of B. 

Applicants completing the NCUK International Foundation year are required to achieve AAB  and an EAP requirements score of B.

Applicants studying other Foundation programmes should contact the academic School to check if their qualification is recognised for entry to this programme and for specific entry requirements.

Pearson BTEC qualifications

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma

We consider the National Extended Diploma for entry provided it is in a subject relevant to the chosen course. 

Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full National Extended Diploma with grades DDD.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma

We consider the National Diploma for entry provided it is in a subject relevant to the chosen course. 

Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full National Diploma with grades DD, plus an additional level 3 qualification such as an A-level at grade B.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Foundation Diploma

We consider the National Foundation Diploma for entry provided it is in a subject relevant to the chosen course. 

Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full National Foundation Diploma with grades DD, plus additional level 3 qualifications such as A-levels at grade AB.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate

We consider the National Extended Certificate for entry provided it is in a subject relevant to the chosen course. 

Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full National Extended Certificate with grade D, plus additional Level 3 qualifications such as A-levels at grades AB.

OCR Cambridge Technical qualifications

Cambridge Level 3 Technical Extended Diploma (CTEC)

We consider the Technical Extended Diploma for entry provided it is in a subject relevant to the chosen course.

Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full Technical Extended Diploma with grades DDD. 

Cambridge Level 3 Technical Diploma (CTEC)

We consider the Technical Diploma for entry provided it is in a subject relevant to the chosen course. 

Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full Technical Diploma with grades DD, plus an additional level 3 qualification such as an A-level at grade B.

Cambridge Level 3 Technical Foundation Diploma (CTEC)

We consider the Technical Foundation Diploma for entry provided it is in a subject relevant to the chosen course. 

Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full Technical Foundation Diploma with grades DD, plus additional level 3 qualifications such as A-level at grades AB.

Cambridge Level 3 Technical Extended Certificate (CTEC)

We consider the Technical Extended Certificate for entry provided it is in a subject relevant to the chosen course. 

Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full Technical Extended Certificate with grade D, plus additional Level 3 qualifications such as A-levels at grades AB.

Access to HE Diploma

We require a QAA-recognised Access to HE Diploma (a minimum of 60 credits overall with at least 45 at Level 3), with merit or distinction in a subject area relevant to the chosen course.

The specific course requirements are 39 credits with Distinction with the remaining Level 3 credits at Merit .

Cambridge Pre-U

We consider applicants offering Pre-U Principal Subjects, or a mix of Pre-U and A Level subjects, provided a minimum of three distinct subjects overall is taken.

Candidates taking Pre-U in conjunction with A-levels are expected to achieve D3, D3, M2 in the Pre-U certificates and Grades AAB at A-level.

Extended Project Qualification (EPQ)

The University recognises the benefit of the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) and the opportunities it provides for applicants to develop independent study and research skills. We strongly encourage you to provide information about the EPQ in your personal statement and at interview. For this programme, as well as the regular conditions of offer, we may make students who are currently taking or completed the EPQ an alternative offer.  For this course it would be ABB plus the Extended Project at Grade A.

Core Maths

The University welcomes and recognises the value of Level 3 core mathematics qualifications (e.g. AQA Certificate in Mathematical Studies). 

Core Mathematics is not a compulsory element of post-16 study and as a result we will not normally include it in the conditions of any offer made to the student. However, if a student chooses to undertake a core mathematics qualification this may be taken into account when we consider their application, particularly for certain non-science courses with a distinct mathematical or statistical element.

We advise students to contact the academic School, who will clarify whether their specific portfolio of qualifications is acceptable for entry on to their chosen course.

Home-schooled applicants

If you are a student who has followed a non-standard educational route, e.g. you have been educated at home; your application will be considered against the standard entry criteria of the course for which you are applying. You will be required to demonstrate that you meet the specified academic entry requirements of the course. We will also require a reference from somebody who knows you well enough, in an official capacity, to write about you and your suitability for higher education. If you are a home schooled student and would like further information or advice please contact the academic School for your chosen course who will be able to help you. 

Non-standard educational routes

Mature students are some of our most well-equipped learners, bringing skills and attributes gained from work, family and other life experiences.  Students come from a whole array of backgrounds, study every kind of course, undertake full-time and part-time learning and are motivated by career intentions as well as personal interest.  There is no such thing as a typical mature student at Manchester.  The application process is the same as for other prospective undergraduates.  If you require further clarification about the acceptability of the qualifications you hold please contact the academic School(s) you plan to apply to.  Further information for mature students can be found here ( http://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/mature-students/ )

English language

All applicants to the University (from the UK and Overseas) are required to show evidence of English Language proficiency.  The minimum English Language requirement for this course is either:

  • IELTS 6.5, with 6.5 in writing and no sub-section below 6.0, or;
  • An acceptable equivalent qualification.

Please note that if you hold English as a second language iGCSE qualification, we may also require you to offer one of our acceptable equivalent English Language qualifications or achieve a higher grade in your iGCSE than the one stated above. Please contact the academic School for clarification.

The UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) requires that every student from outside the UK and the EU must show evidence of a minimum level of English Language in order to be granted a UK visa (Tier 4 visa) to study at undergraduate or postgraduate level. This level is often referred to as the 'B2 level'.

Additionally, our individual Schools may ask for specific English Language proficiency levels that are necessary for their academic programmes. In most cases these requirements are likely to be higher than the B2 level. Further information about our English Language policy, including a list of some of the English Language qualifications we accept, can be found  here .

English language test validity

Some English Language test results are only valid for two years. Your English Language test report must be valid on the start date of the course.

Application and selection

How to apply

Apply through UCAS .

Interview requirements

Interviews are not conducted as part of the recruitment process for this course. However, tutors reserve the right to request an interview.

Disclosure and Barring Service check

As work placements are a mandatory element of the course, you will be required to complete a DBS check upon entry.

Deferrals

Applications for deferred entry are considered equally to other applications up to the point of confirmation. Deferred entry is granted on the discretion of admissions staff, and is normally granted for one year only.

Policy for applicants who resit their qualifications

We will consider applicants who have re-sat individual modules.

If you have re-sat your final examinations, we will consider your application but may require further information in order to make an informed academic judgement on your application.

Re-applications

If you applied in the previous year and your application was not successful you may apply again. Your application will be considered against the standard course entry criteria for that year of entry. 

In your new application, you should demonstrate how your application has improved. We may draw upon all information from your previous applications or any previous registrations at the University as a student when assessing your suitability for your chosen course.

If you are applying for a place for the same year of entry through UCAS Extra, you should provide additional evidence of your suitability for the course.

If you are applying through clearing, you are required to meet the clearing requirements. In both UCAS Extra and clearing the places will be subject to availability.

Transfers

Students wishing to transfer from other universities will be considered on merit, providing we have enough places to accommodate them. 

However, transfers from courses not accredited by the BPS are unlikely to be granted, given the requirements for external accreditation.

Course details

Course description

BSc Educational Psychology will provide you with a strong grounding in educational psychology - the application of psychological theories and principles to context of education.

Educational Psychology is a broad field that draws upon multiple perspectives to help explain and understand human functioning and behaviour.

The course will allow you to explore core areas of psychology specifically in relation to education, including biological, cognitive, social, and developmental psychology. It will also encourage you to consider the importance of individual differences.

You will study both historical and contemporary thinking in these areas, and explore how they intersect with educational theories and philosophies. The course is a great option if you wish to:

  • begin a career pathway towards educational psychology (e.g. become an educational psychologist, play or behavioural therapist, or similar);
  • begin a career pathway towards other professional psychology training routes, with an educational focus (e.g. school-based counselling);
  • progress into teaching and education-based vocations, with a specialism towards pastoral responsibilities and/or special educational needs;
  • prepare for a research career within the public sector and/or private industry.

Special features

Accreditation

Study a course accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS), making you eligible for Chartered Membership of BPS.

Major project

During your final year, you will focus on a subject that takes your interests - and could potentially be your area of expertise after you graduate. This will form your major research project.

Placement opportunities

Applied learning is a key focus within the Manchester Institute of Education. You will undertake a placement in every year of your course to ensure your learnings can be put into real-world practice.

Teaching and learning

You will learn through methods including:
  • lectures and seminars;
  • small-group learning;
  • individual tutorials;
  • self-study materials;
  • group collaboration and team work.

Coursework and assessment

You will be assessed through methods including:
  • essays;
  • team projects;
  • coursework;
  • presentations;
  • written exams;
  • a major project.

Course content for year 1

During Year 1, you will build foundational knowledge of the core areas of psychology in relation to education.

  • Development and Childhood critically examines key theory and research in developmental psychology, and critically evaluates applications and extension of developmental psychological theory in relation to education and child development.
  • Exploring Psychology in the Classroom is the first of three fieldwork opportunities designed to familiarise you with the school environment and systems. You will spend time in local schools, observing classes and having the opportunity to meet and interact with key staffing roles (eg special educational needs coordinators).
  • Foundations of Psychology will introduce you to the study of psychology as a science by examining the social and cultural construction of psychology and its application to `real-world questions' with particular regard to education.
  • Social Psychology of Education will take an exploratory case approach by `walking through' the many experiences of an individual in relation to social-psychological processes that impact on teaching and learning.
  • The Brain Goes to School connects psycho-neurological research to education to demonstrate how an understanding of neurology helps to explain learning in the classroom, and dispel many of the common `myths' in use in education today.
  • Research Issues in Psychology and Education provides a comprehensive grounding in core issues surrounding research in psychology and education, helping you to develop your own understanding and ideas.

Please note that the above course unit details may change.

Course units for year 1

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optional
Developing Academic Writing and Digital Study Skills EDUC10631 10 Mandatory
Key Issues in Education EDUC11100 20 Mandatory
Foundations of psychology EDUC13011 10 Mandatory
Development and childhood EDUC13022 20 Mandatory
The Brain goes to school EDUC13031 20 Mandatory
Exploring psychology in the classroom EDUC13042 10 Mandatory
Social psychology of Education EDUC13052 10 Mandatory
Research issues in psychology and education (1) EDUC13060 20 Mandatory
Foundations of psychology EDUC13011 10 Optional
Development and childhood EDUC13022 20 Optional
The Brain goes to school EDUC13031 20 Optional
Exploring psychology in the classroom EDUC13042 10 Optional
Social psychology of Education EDUC13052 10 Optional
Displaying 10 of 13 course units for year 1

Course content for year 2

In Year 2, there will be a greater emphasis on the application of knowledge and psychological theory in specific relation to education.

You will continue to build and deepen your foundational knowledge of the core areas of psychology in relation to education and develop your ability to evaluate and apply your understanding.

  • Cognition and Learning: Implications for School will show how an understanding of cognitive psychology helps to explain learning in key areas.
  • Counselling and Educational Psychology in the Professional Context offers grounding in the `real world' applications of education and counselling psychology in the professional context, with specific reference to the intersection of research and practice.
  • Core Issues in Research and Education 2 will build upon foundation skills developed in Year 1, specifically in relation to the analysis and interpretation of different data strands in research. It will develop your critical thinking skills and prepare you for your dissertation project in Year 3.
  • Risk and Resilience Processes in Human Development will provide you with an introduction to theory and research relating the concepts of risk and resilience, and their application in the study of human development.
  • Leadership of Learning is the second of three fieldwork opportunities. Training will be offered to support you in participating in (supervised) school activities such as one-to-one working with pupils, teaching parts of lessons under observation and/or designing specific resources and learning materials.

Please note that the above course unit details may change.

Course units for year 2

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optional
Risk & Resilience processes in human development EDUC23011 20 Mandatory
Cognition & Learning: implications for school EDUC23022 20 Mandatory
Research issues in psychology and education (2) EDUC23030 20 Mandatory
Counselling and educational psychology in the professional context EDUC23040 20 Mandatory

Course content for year 3

In Year 3, you will gain further independence in your learning and will be encouraged to draw links between the different components of the course in your application of learning, especially in relation to your dissertation and final year placement. 

In the third fieldwork unit Intervention in Schools , you will draw upon your prior learning and fieldwork experiences in order to run and evaluate a manualised intervention in a partner school.

Drawing upon the some of the key work within the department, the Prevention Science and Education unit aims to develop your knowledge and understanding of how theory and research in prevention science can be applied in educational contexts to improve children's social, emotional and behavioural outcomes.

Current Issues in Special Educational Needs will introduce you to the concept of special educational needs (SEN) both within a legal framework and as a social construct to underpin how psychology can be used to identify types of SEN, assess individuals who may have SEN, develop supportive interventions that can be used in inclusive classrooms and use theory to support teacher training.

Please note that the above course unit details may change.

Facilities

The course is taught by the Manchester Institute of Education (MIE), which has its own Undergraduate Hub. Here you will find all of your teaching staff and support staff. It is also a place to relax with fellow students.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service.

For more information, email dass@manchester.ac.uk .

Careers

Career opportunities

BSc Educational Psychology will prepare you for a career in a range of fields.

You will graduate able to demonstrate specific knowledge of educational psychology and competency in professional educational environments. Potential careers include:

  • child and adolescent counselling and educational psychology;
  • special needs teaching;
  • mental health assistance;
  • school-based intervention training and delivery;
  • educational officer training (for local authorities).

Progression to postgraduate teacher training is also an option, and The University of Manchester's Primary and Secondary PGCEs have been rated as outstanding by Ofsted.

For more information, see Careers and employability

Accrediting organisations

This course is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS).

Graduates are eligible for Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership.