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BAEcon Development Studies and Social Statistics

Year of entry: 2021

Course unit details:
Economic History

Unit code ECON10212
Credit rating 10
Unit level Level 1
Teaching period(s) Semester 2
Offered by School of Social Sciences
Available as a free choice unit? Yes

Overview

The unit aims to:

  1. Provide an introduction to key developments in the history of economics
  2. Provide insights into how economic analysis can explain or help to understand important historic events
  3. Examine how economies have operated and functioned in the past, and consider the value of economic history today 

 

Aims

The unit aims to:

  1. Provide an introduction to key developments in the history of economics.
  2. Provide insights into how economic analysis can explain or help to understand important historic events.
  3. Examine how economies have operated and functioned in the past, and consider the value of economic history today.
     

 

Learning outcomes

At the end of the course unit it is expect that students will be able to:

  1. Understand key developments that have taken place in economic thought
  2. Explain, discuss and analyse important economic events in the past including the main economic mechanisms and interactions that took place
  3. Understand economic behaviour within a broader historical context

 

 

Syllabus

Indicative overview of the syllabus/topics.

1. Introduction (1 lecture)

a. Course overview

b. Why study this course?

c. Lessons from economic history for Covid-19

2. History of economics (3 lectures)

 a. Mercantilism, classical economics, and the free trade movement

 b. Class conflict and the marginalist revolution

 c. Battle of Methods and economic policy

3. The industrial revolution (2 lectures)

 a. Understanding the industrial revolution

 b. Key innovations: how they happened, the role of patents, trade and skills. Changes in system of innovation over time.

4. Economic crises and economic policy (2 lectures)

 a. The Great Depression, German hyperinflation

 b. Post war era: "les trente glorieuses", the Keynes vs monetarism debates of the 1970s and 80s, the Great Moderation 

Teaching and learning methods

Lectures and tutorial classes.

Intellectual skills

Students will develop skills in applying basic economic analysis in a variety of contexts.

Students will develop expertise in evaluating the experience of a diverse range of economies in a rigorous manner. These skills will help prepare students for a range of careers requiring a knowledge of economic analysis and historical change

Practical skills

Students will develop their ability to read economic literature; process and critically evaluate different sources of information; and develop a sustained and coherent written argument.

Transferable skills and personal qualities

Students will develop presentation and interpersonal skills through participation in tutorial sessions.

Employability skills

Analytical skills
Analyse and understand economic phenomenon in a variety of contexts
Oral communication
Present work and engage in interpersonal discussion through participation in tutorial sessions.
Research
Undertake independent research and develop a sustained and coherent written argument.

Assessment methods

10% Presentation

15% Multiple Choice Test

75% Essay (2,500 words)

Feedback methods

  • Students will receive feedback from interactions in tutorials, PASS groups, office hours, a lecture session on essay writing advice, and individual feedback on an essay plan
  • Specific and general feedback will also be provided on the group presentation and final essay

Recommended reading

Roger Backhouse and Keith Tribe, The History of Economics, 2017

Blum, M. and Colvin, C. (eds.), An Economist’s Guide to Economic History, 2018

 

Study hours

Independent study hours
Independent study 0

Teaching staff

Staff member Role
Edward Manderson Unit coordinator

Additional notes

For every 10 course unit credits we expect students to work for around 100 hours. This time generally includes any contact times (online or face to face, recorded and live), but also independent study, work for coursework, and group work. This amount is only a guidance and individual study time will vary.

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