LLB Law with International Study

Year of entry: 2024

Course unit details:
Contemporary Issues in European Union Law

Course unit fact file
Unit code LAWS31121
Credit rating 20
Unit level Level 3
Teaching period(s) Semester 1
Available as a free choice unit? No

Overview

The course will build on the knowledge acquired in the compulsory module of EU Law and will focus on selected contemporary issues in European Union law and Brexit, with the emphasis placed on the following fields of EU Constitutional and EU Substantive Law:

  1. Brexit and the UK/EU post-Brexit Trade and Co-operation Relationship;
  2. Constitutional Identity and EU Law;
  3. Fundamental rights and general principles of EU law;
  4. Digital Rights and EU Law;
  5. Free movement of services in the gaming/gambling sector and public order or morality;
  6. Free movement of audiovisual media services;
  7. Free movement of services and posting of workers;
  8. Free movement of healthcare services and free movement of pharmaceuticals;
  9. Free movement of capital, and the Economic and Monetary Union;

As European integration is an ongoing process, the contents of the module may vary according to the latest developments in EU law and post-Brexit developments, and the interests of students and staff.

 

Pre/co-requisites

Requisites

UG level 1 and 2 modules in Law

Aims

  The course aims to provide UG students with the opportunity to look more closely at selected contemporary issues in European Union law, including a wide range of questions of both EU constitutional and EU substantive law, which have an impact on domestic law and Brexit. The emphasis will be placed on the following fields of EU law:

  1. Brexit and the UK/EU post-Brexit Trade and Co-operation Relationship;
  2. Constitutional Identity and EU Law;
  3. Fundamental rights and general principles of EU law;
  4. Digital Rights and EU Law;
  5. Free movement of services in the gaming/gambling sector and public order or morality;
  6. Free movement of audiovisual media services;
  7. Free movement of services and posting of workers;
  8. Free movement of healthcare services and free movement of pharmaceuticals;
  9. Free movement of capital, and the Economic and Monetary Union.

  The course aims to build on the knowledge acquired in the compulsory course of EU law, provide insights into topical issues of EU law, and fill in a significant gap in the School's current UG curriculum. This fits in very well with the strategic aim of the Law School to maintain and improve its current standing, innovation and excellence in teaching and research among the leading global Law Schools.

 

 

Learning outcomes

 

On completion of this module, students will have acquired in-depth knowledge and understanding of selected questions of EU law and Brexit, such as:

  1. Brexit and the UK/EU post-Brexit Trade and Co-operation Relationship;
  2. Constitutional Identity and EU Law;
  3. Fundamental rights and general principles of EU law;
  4. Digital Rights and EU Law;
  5. Free movement of services in the gaming/gambling sector and public order or morality;
  6. Free movement of audiovisual media services;
  7. Free movement of services and posting of workers;
  8. Free movement of healthcare services and free movement of pharmaceuticals;
  9. Free movement of capital, and the Economic and Monetary Union;
  10. Questions of current legal, social and practical significance emerging from European integration, its impact on the domestic legal system and Brexit;
  11. How to find and use primary and secondary sources of EU law in both electronic and paper format;
  12. How to identify, in the context of essay or problem-based questions, the relevant area(s) of EU, domestic or international law, and critically assess and/or apply the relevant law with precision and accuracy.

Teaching and learning methods

 

3 Weekly one-hour Lectures; 5 Fortnightly one-hour Tutorials

Teaching will take the form of 3 weekly one-hour lectures and 5 fortnightly one-hour tutorials. Whilst lectures are intended to introduce students to the relevant topics of EU law and provide them with a framework for the course, with an eye to structuring discussion in class, tutorials are designed to provide an opportunity for a most pronounced interaction between students and their tutor, student-led group work and learning by discussion, where particular topics will be examined in more detail. All participants are expected to have studied the set reading and be prepared to take part in the discussion in class in a knowledgeable manner and answer the tutorial questions. This module places a strong emphasis on independent learning and research.

Assessment methods

Method Weight
Written assignment (inc essay) 100%

Feedback methods

 

A. Summative Feedback

  1. Individual feedback on the coursework will be provided electronically.
  2. Following the confirmation of the assessment results by the School's Exam Board students may, upon request, receive further clarification of their individual feedback on their performance in the module by the course director(s).

B. Formative Feedback

  1. Lectures and tutorials
  2. Student communication and interaction with lecturers/tutors (in classes, office hours and/or electronically)
  3. The introductory lecture
  4. One (virtual) lecture on legal writing (essay writing and problem-solving) skills
  5. Revision lectures
  6. Outline of draft answer to coursework assignment: Students are encouraged, if they wish, to submit to their tutor(s) a short (no longer than 300-word or one page long) outline of the draft structure of their planned answer to the coursework assignment. This should be submitted or emailed to their tutor(s) no later than the end of Week 11. Their tutor(s) will comment briefly only on their draft structure during office hours (max. 5 minutes per students) or by email but cannot answer the assignment question for them.

Recommended reading

FULL READING LIST AVAILABLE IN THE LIBRARY RECOMMENDED BASIC READING:

C. Barnard, The Substantive Law of the EU - The Four Freedoms (7th ed., Oxford: OUP 2022);

P. Craig and G. de Burca, EU Law: Text, Cases and Materials – UK Version (7th ed., Oxford: OUP, 2020);

T.C. Hartley, The Foundations of European Union Law (8th ed., Oxford: OUP, 2014);

A. Arnull and D. Chalmers (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of European Union Law (Oxford:

OUP, 2015);

D. Chalmers, G. Davies and G. Monti, European Union Law: Text and Materials (3rd ed.,

Cambridge: CUP, 2014);

A. Dashwood, M. Dougan, B. Rodger, E. Spaventa and D. Wyatt, Wyatt and Dashwood's

European Union Law (6th ed., Oxford: Hart Publishing, 2011);

R. Schutze, European Union Law (Cambridge: CUP, 2015)

R. Schutze, European Constitutional Law (Cambridge: CUP, 2012)

J. Shaw et al., Economic and Social Law of the European Union (Palgrave Macmilan, 2017);

S. Weatherill, Cases & Meterials on EU Law (12th ed., Oxford: OUP, 2016);

C. Barnard and S. Peers (eds.) European Union Law (Oxford: OUP, 2016):

L. Woods and P. Watson, Steiner and Woods EU Law (12ed., Oxford: OUP, 2014);

R. Schutze, An Introduction to European Law (2nd ed., Cambridge: CUP, 2015);

D. Edward and R. Lane, Edward and Lane on European Union Law (Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, 2013);

R. Schutze, EU Treaties and Legislation (Cambridge: CUP, 2015);

P. Drury, Core EU Legislation 2017-2018 (28th ed., Oxford: OUP, 2017); J. Kenner, European Union Legislation 2012-2013 (5th ed., London & New York: Rouledge, 2013).

 

Study hours

Scheduled activity hours
Lectures 30
Tutorials 5
Independent study hours
Independent study 165

Teaching staff

Staff member Role
Eleanor Aspey Unit coordinator
Dimitrios Doukas Unit coordinator

Additional notes

Multiple-choice test is a closed book examination

Restricted to students within Law

Pre-requisites: UG level 1 and 2 modules in Law

Co-requisites: none

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