05
October
2018
|
16:59
Europe/London

Academic calls for carbon capture and storage at Conservative conference

An academic from The University of Manchester has called for a carbon capture and storage industry to be developed in the UK, and for it to be required alongside shale gas and hydrogen’s developing contributions to the UK energy systems.

At this week's Conservative Party conference in Birmingham, Dr John Broderick of the School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering said:

"Panels hosted by Policy Exchange, Cadent, The Taxpayers' Alliance and UKOOG promoted hydrogen and shale gas as contributors to the UK energy system in the not-so-distant future, but both technologies currently have a high climate impacts.

"If hydrogen and shale gas are to be developed at scale, then a carbon capture and storage industry will also be required alongside them to keep within our carbon budgets. However, in the UK we are yet to see a policy framework for its delivery beyond some small pilot projects. Time is of the essence here, as we must make decisions about the long-term role of our gas grid.
 

If hydrogen and shale gas are to be developed at scale, then a carbon capture and storage industry will also be required alongside them to keep within our carbon budgets. However, in the UK we are yet to see a policy framework for its delivery beyond some small pilot projects. Time is of the essence here, as we must make decisions about the long-term role of our gas grid.
Dr John Broderick

“Power generator Drax also raised the prospect of Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage (BECCS), which is widely discussed as a key technology for delivering the Paris Agreement on Climate Change goals by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. It will be important to continue to refine the technology and introduce incentives to scale up - however, there are many non-technical challenges in terms of policy and governance of the whole supply chain.”

Researchers at the Tyndall Centre have laid out many of these issues in a world’s first book on the topic, and have summarised six key policy challenges in an article for Carbon Brief.

Dr Broderick was one of several academics attending the Conservative Party Conference with Policy@Manchester to discuss their research with cabinet ministers and a wide range of MPs.

Energy is one of The University of Manchester’s research beacons - examples of pioneering discoveries, interdisciplinary collaboration and cross-sector partnerships that are tackling some of the biggest questions facing the planet. #ResearchBeacons

Share this release