04
February
2019
|
10:00
Europe/London

University awarded three CDTs and over £19m in research funding

The University of Manchester has secured more than £19million of research investment after being awarded three Centres for Doctoral Training (CDT).

The Centres will train the next generation of doctoral level students in a range of research and innovation disciplines across engineering and physical sciences.

Manchester’s CDTs are Advanced Biomedical Materials, based in our School of Materials; Integrated Catalysis, based in the School of Chemistry and Nuclear Energy - GREEN (Growing skills for Reliable Economic Energy from Nuclear) in the School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering (MACE).

The Centres will be funded through the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), part of UK Research and Innovation (UKRI). It has allocated £444 million with a further £2.2 million coming from The Natural Environment Research Council (NERC).

Industry partners are contributing a further £386 million in cash or in-kind. This funding will be split across 75 different CDTs around the country.

The Advanced Biomedical Materials CDT will develop the next cohort of biomedical materials scientists to work in growing industries such as bioelectronics and fibre technology.

Professor Sarah Cartmell, Professor of Bioengineering and Programme Director for the Advanced Biomedical Materials CDT, said: “Biomedical materials have advanced dramatically over the past 50 years and continue to evolve today.

“With a rapidly growing and ageing population, there is greater demand for more effective and cost-effective healthcare interventions, and this CDT will train an interdisciplinary cohort of students to compete in this field.”

The GREEN CDT is a collaboration between Manchester, Lancaster, Leeds, Liverpool and Sheffield universities. This centre will train expert nuclear scientists and engineers.

Manchester’s GREEN centre lead, Professor Sarah Heath, said: “This is an extremely exciting time to work in nuclear science and engineering. The industry is witnessing significant investment and nuclear energy will be an essential component in the country’s efforts to meet climate change targets.”

Biomedical materials have advanced dramatically over the past 50 years and continue to evolve today. With a rapidly growing and ageing population, there is greater demand for more effective and cost-effective healthcare interventions, and this CDT will train an interdisciplinary cohort of students to compete in this field
Professor Sarah Cartmell

The Integrated Catalysis CDT is will develop a new generation of interdisciplinary chemists and engineers specialising in biological and chemical catalysis which, simply put, is transforming the way molecules are made.

Professor Michael Greaney, Chair in Organic Chemistry at Manchester and Integrated Catalysis CDT Programme Director, said: “The UK has one of the world's top-performing chemical industries, achieving outstanding levels of growth, exports, productivity and international investment.

“We aim to train and develop a new generation of chemistry and engineering leaders with the skills to be at the forefront of that growth for years to come.”

The Centres will be funded through EPSRC, which has allocated £444 million and a further £2.2 million from The Natural Environment Research Council (NERC).

The Centres’ 1,400 project partners have contributed £386 million in cash and in-kind support, and include companies such as Tata Steel and Procter and Gamble and charities such as Cancer Research UK.

Science and Innovation Minister Chris Skidmore added: “As we explore new research to boost our economy with an increase of over £7 billion invested in R&D over five years to 2021/22 – the highest increase for over 40 years – we will need skilled people to turn ideas into inventions that can have a positive impact on our daily lives.

“The Centres for Doctoral Training at universities across the country will offer the next generation of PHD students the ability to get ahead of the curve. In addition, this has resulted in nearly £400 million being leveraged from industry partners. This is our modern Industrial Strategy in action, ensuring all corners of the UK thrive with the skills they need for the jobs of tomorrow.

“As Science Minister, I’m delighted we’re making this massive investment in postgraduate students as part of our increased investment in R&D.”

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