LLB Law

Year of entry: 2024

Course unit details:
Human Rights

Course unit fact file
Unit code LAWS20880
Credit rating 20
Unit level Level 2
Teaching period(s) Full year
Available as a free choice unit? No

Overview

The course unit aims to: provide students with an insight into the nature of legal rights and what is meant by human rights. It will provide an in-depth consideration of the role of human rights in English law, and the operation of the Human Rights Act 1998, and the European Convention on Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms 1950. In examining a range of practical circumstances in which human rights claims have been made, it will provide a current and contextual analysis of the influence of human rights on the development of English law.

Aims

The course unit aims to: provide students with an insight into the nature of legal rights and what is meant by human rights. It will provide an in-depth consideration of the role of human rights in English law, and the operation of the Human Rights Act 1998, and the European Convention on Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms 1950. In examining a range of practical circumstances in which human rights claims have been made, it will provide a current and contextual analysis of the influence of human rights on the development of English law.

Syllabus

Brief overview of the syllabus/topics.

1. Philosophical foundations and development of human rights

2. Human Rights in the UK

3. The ECHR & ECtHR

4. Case Study 1: i.e. Destitution and the ECHR

5. Case Study 2: i.e. Formalised same-sex marriages.

6. Case Study 3: i.e. Press Freedom

 

Please note that the case studies noted above are indicative only. They are subject to change depending on the expertise available in the school at the time of delivery.

Teaching and learning methods

his course unit uses the standard approach of a combination of lectures and 2-hour workshops as the scheduled teaching and learning activities.

 

Lectures will introduce the content and skills taught on this course and will be taught by a team of colleagues, including guest lecturers. Some lectures may include interactive elements or may require students to do individual or group preparation in advance.

 

Workshops will enable students to participate in a range of activities in small groups and will be led by the workshop leader. Each workshop will follow from the lectures in a particular topic and will provide questions and exercises designed to explore and clarify the legal principles and their operation and raise points for consideration and discussion. Workshops will provide students with an opportunity to debate and discuss the legal principles at stake and the underlying policy and ethical considerations in engaging with human rights arguments. Workshops will support active approaches to learning and encourage students to socially construct knowledge using active group work both within, and in preparation for, workshops. Students will have individual reading and group tasks to prepare before workshops and opportunities for formal/informal and tutor-led/peer-to-peer feedback will be embedded in workshop design. One workshop will include consideration of a formative assessment designed to support the blog assessment at the end of semester 1. It will consider the role of blogs, the writing style associated with blogging and the purposes of legal blogging, including critique and analysis. Support for the forthcoming summative assessment will be provided.

 

This course unit has a Blackboard page which will be used to deliver the range of course materials and information about teaching, learning and assessment for that course unit.

Knowledge and understanding

Students should be able to critically evaluate the nature of human rights claims and the difficulties presented by analysing arguments in terms of rights.

Students should be able to explain, with relevant examples, how the European Convention on Human Rights 1950 impacts on the law of England and Wales through the operation of the Human Rights Act 1998.

Students should appreciate the inter-relationship between the European Court of Human Rights with the English legal system, analysing the use of case law from the European court in the English courts.

Intellectual skills

Students should be able to apply legal and non-legal knowledge and sources to analysing circumstances in which real-life human rights claims may be argued.

 

Students should be able to critique policy arguments, and analyse ethical issues underlying human rights claims. The should be able to formulate complex arguments and reach reasoned conclusions regarding real-life contexts and examples.

Practical skills

Students should be able to locate and correctly reference primary legal sources relating to the Council of Europe and the European Convention on Human Rights 1950, including the case law of the European Court of Human Rights.

 

Students should be able to correctly find and reference statute and case law on human rights in England and Wales, and make appropriate reference to other, non-legal, policy materials.

Transferable skills and personal qualities

Students will be expected to demonstrate an open-minded approach to controversial and highly sensitive personal issues, appreciating the importance of equality, diversity and inclusivity.

Assessment methods

Method Weight
Other 70%
Written assignment (inc essay) 30%

Written Task (blog) 1000 words

Coursework 2500 words

Feedback methods

Students will recieve both individual and cohort feedback

Recommended reading

Rainey, B, McCormick, P, Ovey, C. The European Convention on Human Rights (OUP)

Study hours

Scheduled activity hours
Lectures 20
Practical classes & workshops 12
Independent study hours
Independent study 168

Teaching staff

Staff member Role
Luke Graham Unit coordinator

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