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PhD/MPhil Biomaterials / Programme details

Year of entry: 2020

Programme description

The Biomaterials research programmes cover an exciting area of research in the Department focusing both on fundamental understanding of interactions between man-made materials and biological tissues and the development of useful applications.  We have close links with the world's leading pharmaceutical and medical device companies and the clinical applications of our research impact many areas of medicine. There are flexible study packages available, as well as an extensive range of  PhD studentships   and  University funding packages . Many of our research students are sponsored by a variety of Department, University and industry resources. Please contact us to find out more.

The subject

The subject of biomaterials covers those materials that are used in the context of biology and medicine, usually to evaluate, treat, augment or replace any tissue, organ or function of the body.  In surgery, a biomaterial may be a synthetic material used to replace part of a living system or to function in intimate contact with living tissue.

A new area in biomaterials involves the exploration of nanotechnology for drug delivery, biological sensing or tissue regeneration.  Examples of these bionanomaterials are small particles that may be used for the delivery of drug molecules to target sites within the body or to detect diseased areas.

Biomaterials are produced using chemical, physical, mechanical processes and they often employ or mimic biological phenomena in order for them to interact with their biological surroundings in defined ways.

Application of research

The clinical applications of our research impact many areas of medicine, including drug delivery, cancer, wound healing, stem cell technology, repair and regeneration of nerve, tendon, cartilage, bone, intevertebral disc, skin, ligament and cornea.

Industry collaboration

We have strong ties with industry, including ongoing collaboration with Smith & Nephew, Johnson & Johnson, and Versamatrix A/S (Denmark), developing novel biomaterial based strategies for wound healing, bone repair, control of inflammation and drug delivery.

See more about this research area at https://www.materials.manchester.ac.uk/research/themes/biomaterials/ .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: dass@manchester.ac.uk