Clearing 2022

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BAEcon Economics

Year of entry: 2022

Course unit details:
Power and Protest

Course unit fact file
Unit code SOCY30461
Credit rating 20
Unit level Level 3
Teaching period(s) Semester 1
Offered by Sociology
Available as a free choice unit? Yes

Overview

The course introduces a range of theories and perspectives for analysing social movements and protest. It looks at key social movements, including the shift from the labour movement to new social movements, global social movements, and ‘ugly’ social movements, like terrorism. It also considers arguments about levels and forms of protest in modern societies, from debates about how the pandemic has (and might) affect protest, to suggestions that contemporary protest has changed from collective to more individualised forms.

Aims

The course introduces you to a range of perspectives for analysing social movements and protest, and aims to link levels and forms of protest to competing views of power. We look at several theories drawn from the field of social movement studies and consider them in dialogue with case studies of historical and contemporary movements. We look at key social movements, including the shift from the labour movement to new social movements, global social movements, and ‘ugly’ social movements, like terrorism. We also consider arguments about levels and forms of protest in modern societies, from debates about how the pandemic has (and might) affect levels and forms of protest, to those who suggest that contemporary protest has changed from collective to more individualised practices of resistance.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this unit successful students will be able to:

- Deploy a range of theories and perspectives to analyse historical and contemporary social movements

- Critically evaluate theories of protest

- Relate levels and forms of protest to theories and debates about the nature of power in modern societies

- Develop new approaches and arguments through independent research

Teaching and learning methods

3-hour weekly sessions, consisting of 2-hour lecture and 1-hour workshop

 

Assessment methods

Method Weight
Written exam 50%
Written assignment (inc essay) 50%

1 non-assessed assignment (protest journal and roundtable event)

1 assessed coursework essay (3000 words, 50% of mark)

1 online open book exam (2 hours/2 answers, 1250 words per answer as guidance)

Feedback methods

 

All sociology courses include both formative feedback – which lets you know how you’re getting on and what you could do to improve – and summative feedback – which gives you a mark for your assessed work.
 

Recommended reading

Edwards, G. (2014) Social Movements and Protest. Cambridge University Press (course textbook)

Study hours

Scheduled activity hours
Assessment written exam 2
Lectures 30
Independent study hours
Independent study 168

Teaching staff

Staff member Role
Gemma Edwards Unit coordinator

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