BSc International Business, Finance and Economics / Course details

Year of entry: 2022

Course unit details:
Introduction to Mathematical Economics

Unit code ECON20192
Credit rating 10
Unit level Level 2
Teaching period(s) Semester 2
Offered by Economics
Available as a free choice unit? Yes

Overview

Prepare Students for the study of intermediate and advanced topics in Mathematical Economics. This unit is to introduce students to those mathematical techniques that are required in the study of advanced economic theory

By the end of the course students will have

Understand the concepts of proof and counter example

Expanded mathematical toolbox for mathematical economics

Pre/co-requisites

Unit title Unit code Requirement type Description
Advanced Mathematics ECON10071 Pre-Requisite Compulsory
Advanced Mathematics ECON20071 Pre-Requisite Compulsory
ECON20192 Pre-requisites: ECON10071 or ECON20071

ECON10071 OR ECON20071

Aims

Prepare Students for the study of intermediate and advanced topics in Mathematical Economics. This unit is to introduce students to those mathematical techniques that are required in the study of advanced economic theory.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the course, you will:

  1. Understand the concepts of proof and counter example.
  2. Have expanded students mathematical toolbox for mathematical economics.

 

Syllabus

 Sequences, limits, and sets. Open, closed, and compact sets

Continuity and differentiability

Concavity and quasi-concavity

Constrained optimization with many inequality constraints, Lagrangian methods, and applications to economics.

Teaching and learning methods

Online Learning and Guided Self-Study

 

Employability skills

Analytical skills
Problem solving

Assessment methods

70% Exam

15% Coursework

15% Coursework

 

Feedback methods

 

 

Recommended reading

Simon, C. and Blume, L. (2010) Mathematics for Economists, International Student Edition, Norton, NY.

Study hours

Independent study hours
Independent study 0

Teaching staff

Staff member Role
Horst Zank Unit coordinator

Additional notes

For every 10 course unit credits we expect students to work for around 100 hours. This time generally includes any contact times (online or face to face, recorded and live), but also independent study, work for coursework, and group work. This amount is only a guidance and individual study time will vary

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