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MA Gender, Sexuality and Culture / Course details

Year of entry: 2020

Course unit details:
Social Capital and Social Change

Unit code SOCY71012
Credit rating 15
Unit level FHEQ level 7 – master's degree or fourth year of an integrated master's degree
Teaching period(s) Semester 2
Offered by Sociology
Available as a free choice unit? Yes

Overview

 Aims/Objectives: 

  • To theorise the role of the mutual effects of social capital and social change: social capital understood in broad terms of social connections and social change understood in terms of changes in social capital and ethnic-class inequality
  • To empirically measure the different aspects of social capital
  • To see the patterns and trends of formal and informal aspects of social capital chiefly in capitalist countries, particularly in the US and the UK
  • To examine underlying (individual and contextual) factors for social capital generation, and the impacts of social capital upon people’s socio-political orientations (such as trust) and socio-economic outcomes (such as education, health, labour market access and occupational attainment)
  • To assess other important changes in socio-economic life such as social mobility, immigration and ethnic fortunes in the labour market
  • To compare the changing pattern and trends of ethnic disadvantage in employment and class attainment in Britain and the USA

Aims

 Aims/Objectives: 

  • To theorise the role of the mutual effects of social capital and social change: social capital understood in broad terms of social connections and social change understood in terms of changes in social capital and ethnic-class inequality
  • To empirically measure the different aspects of social capital
  • To see the patterns and trends of formal and informal aspects of social capital chiefly in capitalist countries, particularly in the US and the UK
  • To examine underlying (individual and contextual) factors for social capital generation, and the impacts of social capital upon people’s socio-political orientations (such as trust) and socio-economic outcomes (such as education, health, labour market access and occupational attainment)
  • To assess other important changes in socio-economic life such as social mobility, immigration and ethnic fortunes in the labour market
  • To compare the changing pattern and trends of ethnic disadvantage in employment and class attainment in Britain and the USA

Learning outcomes

On completion of this unit successful students will be able to:

  • Critically assess the measurement of social capital through survey data
  • Provide a theoretical grounding for different conceptions/measurement of social capital
  • Analyse the distinction between formal and informal social capital with its respective sources and consequences, between social and cultural/human capital, and between social
  • Compare and contrast different theoretical approaches to social capital and their empirical implications in quantitative, survey-based research
  • Understand important social changes in class and ethnic relations

Syllabus

  • Theoretical approaches to social capital: a conceptual journey
  • Social capital in the US and the UK: patterns and trends of civic engagement
  • Measurement and distribution of social capital: formal and informal
  • Determinants of social capital: class, gender and locality
  • Impacts of social capital on trust, health, education and labour market positions
  • Social capital and socio-economic disadvantages by minority ethnic groups
  • Social change in Britain: class, education, ethnicity and labour market
  • Social mobility and social capital
  • Social deprivation and ethnic diversity on social capital and civic governance
  • Socio-cultural capital: new forms of social stratification

Teaching and learning methods

 Teaching and learning methods:

  • 10 2-hour lectures including guided student presentations

 

Assessment methods

Method Weight
0%

Feedback methods

  •  critique a paper during the course
  • questions and answers on BBd
  • group discussions in course
  • Past essays – a ‘model’ essay on the module (pending author approval)

Study hours

Independent study hours
Independent study 0

Teaching staff

Staff member Role
Yaojun Li Unit coordinator

Additional notes

 

 

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