MSc Development Finance

Year of entry: 2021

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Course unit details:
Work and Employment in the Global Economy

Unit code MGDI60131
Credit rating 15
Unit level FHEQ level 7 – master's degree or fourth year of an integrated master's degree
Teaching period(s) Semester 1
Offered by Global Development Institute
Available as a free choice unit? Yes

Overview

The aim of this course is to examine issues of work and employment in the global economy. Students will be able to develop an appreciation for different conceptual approaches and be exposed to key debates and significant trends.

The course will cover conventional and critical theories of labour markets, work and employment. Specific dimensions of labour markets will be covered, such as economic migration, gender, informality and unfree labour.

These will be examined within the context of the changing dynamics of work in a global economy, including both rising mobility and increasing insecurity of work.

Different approaches to workers' rights and labour market regulation will be considered, including labour organizing, international labour standards in trade agreements, and multi-stakeholder interventions.

Aims

The aim of this course is to examine issues of work and employment in the global economy. Students will be able to develop an appreciation for different conceptual approaches and be exposed to key debates and significant trends.

The course will cover conventional and critical theories of labour markets, work and employment. Specific dimensions of labour markets will be covered, such as economic migration, gender, informality and unfree labour.

These will be examined within the context of the changing dynamics of work in a global economy, including both rising mobility and increasing insecurity of work.

Different approaches to workers' rights and labour market regulation will be considered, including labour organizing, international labour standards in trade agreements, and multi-stakeholder interventions.

Teaching and learning methods

This module draws on a range of teaching and learning strategies, from lectures, classroom discussions and independent learning by students. Most two hour sessions will be predominantly lecture based. Questions and student participation are encouraged and welcomed. Students are expected to have completed the required readings for each session. There will also be three 2-hour tutorials for more in-depth discussion on core readings, and one interactive student participation session. There will also be opportunities for video screenings and discussion.

Knowledge and understanding

  • Demonstrate a grounded understanding of conceptual approaches, empirical trends and issues concerning labour regulation
  • Understand and be able to compare conceptual and analytical debates over work and employment in the development of the global economy
  • Be able to critically evaluate empirical data, case studies and official reports on work and employment in the global economy

Intellectual skills

  • Be informed of different paradigmatic approaches to analysis of the work and employment in a global economy
  • Critically assess and compare a variety of analytical perspectives
  • Apply different conceptual perspectives to analysis of work and employment across diverse development contexts and regions (including in Asia, Africa and Latin America)
     

Practical skills

  • Develop critical, analytical, writing, communication and presentation skills

Assessment methods

Method Weight
Written exam 70%
Written assignment (inc essay) 30%

Feedback methods

Formal feedback on written assignments will be provided via Blackboard. Students will be given an opportunity to submit an essay outline for comments and feedback. In-class discussion and interaction is encouraged.

Recommended reading

W. Milberg (ed) (2004) Labor and the Globalization of Production Basingstoke, Palgrave

N. Castree, N. Coe, K. Ward and M. Samers (2003) Spaces of Work: Global Capitalism and the Geographies of Labour London, Sage.
 

G. Gereffi (2006) The New Offshoring of Jobs, Geneva, International Labour Organisation
 

K. Elliott and R. Freeman (2003) Can Labour Standards Improve under Globalisation? Washington D.C., Institute for International Economics
 

Richard Locke (2013), The Promise and Limits of Private Power: Promoting Labour Standards in a Global Economy, Cambridge University Press.

S. Barrientos (2019) Gender and Work in Global Value Chains: Capturing the Gains? Cambridge University Press

Study hours

Scheduled activity hours
Lectures 20
Tutorials 10
Independent study hours
Independent study 120

Teaching staff

Staff member Role
Aarti Krishnan Unit coordinator

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