MA Political Economy (Standard Route) / Course details

Year of entry: 2021

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Course unit details:
Industrial Competitiveness and Global Transformation

Unit code MGDI60002
Credit rating 15
Unit level FHEQ level 7 – master's degree or fourth year of an integrated master's degree
Teaching period(s) Semester 2
Offered by Global Development Institute
Available as a free choice unit? Yes

Overview

Globalisation is transforming the world economy in radical ways. In particular, it is placing local producers under greater pressure to engage with, and compete in, the global economy in order to survive and grow. How can local producers in the developing world enhance their abilities and their competitive edge? How are such producers linked into global markets? What possibilities are there for such producers to innovate, acquire new know-how and grow? What are the new areas of competition? What evidence is there of global industrial success, and of industrial failure, within the developing world? What are the implications for policy? This module aims to address these questions by providing students with a thorough understanding of emergent areas within global competition and industrial development. It uses an analytical framework that incorporates macro analysis of trade and industrial policy with meso (sectoral) and micro (firm) level insights. In addition to providing a theoretical and conceptual understanding, it draws on recent empirical evidence and research case studies.

Aims

Globalisation is transforming the world economy in radical ways. In particular, it is placing local producers under greater pressure to engage with, and compete in, the global economy in order to survive and grow.  How can local producers in the developing world enhance their abilities and their competitive edge? How are such producers linked into global markets? What possibilities are there for such producers to innovate, acquire new know-how and grow? What are the new areas of competition? What evidence is there of global industrial success, and of industrial failure, within the developing world? What are the implications for policy? This module aims to address these questions by providing students with a thorough understanding of emergent areas within global competition and industrial development. It uses an analytical framework that incorporates macro analysis of trade and industrial policy with meso (sectoral) and micro (firm and household) level insights. In addition to providing a theoretical and conceptual understanding, it draws on recent empirical evidence and research case studies.

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes of the course are listed below.

Teaching and learning methods

This module draws on a range of teaching and learning strategies, from lectures, group presentations, class discussions and independent learning by students. Most two hour sessions will be organized around a lecture, while one session will be based on a half day factory visit.  There will be four 1.5 hour tutorials for more in-depth discussion on core readings. These essential sessions will focus on specific questions, exercises or group presentations that students will have been advised of prior to the class. Students are expected to have completed the core readings for each session – both lectures, field visits and tutorials.

Knowledge and understanding

  • A comprehensive knowledge of theoretical and analytical approaches to global industrial competitiveness at the macro, meso and micro levels.
  • Awareness of key debates in the field and a grasp of the divergent evidence from developed, developing and emerging economies.
  • Awareness of the interactions between industrial competitiveness and international, national and regional level policy frameworks.
  • Awareness of the role of production organisation, technological capabilities and innovation in achieving industrial competitiveness.
  • Awareness of the regional variations in industrial competitiveness and the role of the state in (re-)shaping industrial policy today.

Intellectual skills

  • Critical reading skills, including synthesis and critique of literature
  • Engagement with, and participation in, key debates on industrial development and international competitiveness
  • Critical thinking and analytical writing skills through the composition of short review notes and an essay engaging with a course-related theme

Practical skills

  • Ability to locate critical literatures
  • Develop practical understanding of key policy debates in industrial competitiveness and its implications for international development
  • Acquire presentation skills though tutorials and group case studies
  • Develop capacity to undertake group-based work
  • Ability to produce high quality written work

Transferable skills and personal qualities

  •  Analytical abilities and engagement with key bodies of critical literatures
  • Develop practical understanding of key debates in industrial competitiveness and its implications for international development
  • Acquire presentation skills though tutorials and case studies.
  • Develop capacity to undertake group-based work

Assessment methods

Method Weight
Written assignment (inc essay) 70%
Set exercise 30%

Feedback methods

Written feedback on mid-course formative assignment – critical review notes – will be provided within 15 working days of submission deadline.

Brief written feedback will be provided on essay titles and abstracts, as well as opportunity to discuss during office hours.

Written feedback will be provided on final assignment - term paper essay - within 15 working days of submission deadline at end of course.

Recommended reading

There are no specific texts that cover all aspects of this course, and each session has a distinct set of readings. However, the following books and articles are recommended:

Amsden, A., 2001, The Rise of the Rest: Challenges to the west from late industrializing economies, Oxford: Oxford University Press (see Chapter 1)

Cimoli, M., Dosi, G., and Stiglitz, J., eds., 2009, Industrial Policy and Development, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Dicken, P 2015, Global Shift: Mapping the Changing Contours of the World Economy, 7th edn., Sage.

Kaplinsky, R., 2005, Globalisation, Poverty and Inequality: Between a rock and a hard place, Cambridge: Polity Press.

Milberg, W. and Winkler, D., 2013, Outsourcing economics: Global value chains in capitalist development, New York: Cambridge University Press.

Porter M., 1998, The Competitive Advantage of Nations, London: Macmillan.

Rodrik, D., 2011, The Globalization Paradox: Democracy and the Future of the World Economy, W.W. Norton, New York and London.

Schmitz, H., (ed.), 2004, Local Enterprises in the Global Economy: Issues of Governance and Upgrading, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar. (see especially Chapters 1, 2 and 4)

Study hours

Scheduled activity hours
External visits 5
Lectures 20
Tutorials 6
Independent study hours
Independent study 119

Teaching staff

Staff member Role
Shamel Azmeh Unit coordinator

Additional notes

 

 

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