MSc Human Resource Management (International Development) / Course details

Year of entry: 2020

Course unit details:
Human Resource Development & Leadership

Unit code MGDI60162
Credit rating 15
Unit level FHEQ level 7 – master's degree or fourth year of an integrated master's degree
Teaching period(s) Semester 2
Offered by Global Development Institute
Available as a free choice unit? Yes

Overview

This module critically examines contemporary theories and practice of leadership and its implications for the development agenda in an increasingly interconnected and complex world. It critically explores global agendas pertinent to the understanding of the dynamics of leaders and followers behaviours in diverse cultural and geopolitical contexts.

Aims

The aim of this module is to examine the changing contexts and contemporary theories of leadership and its implications for the development agenda in a globalising world. It critically explores global and local issues pertinent to the understanding of the dynamics of leadership and follower behaviours in diverse cultural and geo-political contexts. The main purpose of this effort is to show that the dominant views of Global North interpretations of leadership are limited in their approach, when considered in developing countries’ contexts.

Teaching and learning methods

This module is delivered via series of lectures and tutorials, using a mix of case studies, discussion groups and other classroom based activities. Blackboard will be used for the distribution of teaching and learning materials. It will also be used as an interactive mechanism between students and tutors, for example, to direct students to particular readings or to provide news about the module or the module content.

 

Knowledge and understanding

Students should be able to:

  • Understand and critically evaluate the theory and practice of leadership and its historical and social foundations.
  • Understand and critically discuss comparative leadership styles and relational leading.
  • Develop knowledge about HRD strategic interventions that focus on leadership and capacity development in international organizations including the UN and INGOs.
  • Understand the relationship between ethics, CSR and leadership in development context.

Intellectual skills

Students should be able to:

  • Expand students’ knowledge about strategies for developing leadership, including women’s leadership capacity in a globalising world.
  • Critique the societal, political and development context of education policy planning and leadership development
  • Critique own leadership knowledge and personal skill requirements

Practical skills

  • Prepare leadership plans for specific organization or country’s contexts
  • Prepare and critically reflect on personal leadership development plans

 

Transferable skills and personal qualities

  • Be able to develop leadership strategies which focus on inclusiveness, diversity, ethicality and social justice, which helps build women’s leadership capabilities as well as those of other marginalized groups.

 

Assessment methods

Method Weight
Written assignment (inc essay) 80%
Practical skills assessment 20%

Feedback methods

Feedback will be provided, using a mix of face-to-face oral and written methods.

Recommended reading

 

Essential readings

 

Bryman, A. (Ed.). (2011). The Sage Handbook of Leadership. London: Sage Publications.

Buchanan, D., and Badham, R. (2008). Power, Politics and Organisational Change: Winning the Turf Game, 2nd ed. London: Sage.

Ciulla, J.B. (2003). The Ethics of Leadership. Belmont, CA: Thomson Learning, 

Foote, M. and Ruona, W. (2008). Institutionalizing Ethics: A Synthesis of Frameworks and the Implications for HRD. Human Resource Development Review, 7(3), pp.292-308.

Gill, R. (2006), Theory and Practice of Leadership. London: Sage  

Grint, K. and Jackson, B. (2010). Toward 'socially constructive' social constructions of leadership Management Communication Quarterly, 24: 348-355.

Grint, K. (2010). Placing leadership. Policy Studies 31(b): 365-366.

Grint, K. (2010). The cuckoo clock syndrome : addicted to command, allergic to leadership. European Management Journal 28(a): 306-313.

Grint, K. (2011). If Total Place, Big Society & Local Leadership are the Answers: What’s the Question? Leadership 7: 85-98.

Head, B. and Alford, J. (2013). Wicked Problems: Implications for Public Policy and Management. Administration & Society, 47(6): 711-739.

Kets de Vries, M. (2001). The Leadership Mystique, London: Pearson Education.

Kouzes, J.M., and Posner, B.Z. (2008). The Leadership Challenge, 4th ed. San Francisco: Jossey Bass

Northouse, P. G. (2007). Leadership: Theory and Practice, 5th edn. London: Sage.

 

Other readings

Rose, G. (1997). Situating knowledges: positionality, reflexivity and other tactics. Progress in Human Geography, 21: 305-20.

Thorpe, R. Gold, J, Mumford, A. (2010). Leadership and Management Development. London: Gower Publishing.

UNDP (2013). Corporate Sustainability and the United Nations Post-2015 Development Agenda. New York: UNDP.

UNDP (2013). Architects of a Better World, Global Leaders’ Summit, September, New York

UNDP (2014). United Nations Global Compact Strategy 2014 – 2016

UNDP, BDP-CDG. (2005). Leadership for Human Development: A UNDP Capacity Development Resource. New York: UNDP (see also web pages on capacity development for additional reports and updates)

Yammarino, F.J. (2002). Leadership skills: Introduction and overview. Leadership Quarterly, 11(1), 5-9.

Yukl, G.A. (1998). Leadership in organisations, 4th ed. NJ: Prentice Hall.

 

         Key Journals:

  • Leadership
  • Leadership Quarterly
  • International Journal of T

Study hours

Scheduled activity hours
Lectures 20
Tutorials 4
Independent study hours
Independent study 126

Teaching staff

Staff member Role
Kelechi Ekuma Unit coordinator

Additional notes

The module is delivered via series of ten 2hr lectures and four tutorials sessions, using a mix of case studies, discussion groups and other classroom based activities. Blackboard will be used for the distribution of teaching and learning materials. It will also be used as an interactive mechanism between students and tutors, for example, to direct students to particular readings or to provide news about the module or the module content.

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