MRes Criminology / Course details

Year of entry: 2019

Course description

The MRes in Criminology provides you with the advanced theoretical, conceptual and methodological expertise and skills necessary to undertake and critically evaluate criminological, socio-legal and criminal justice research.

Combining core research skills with specialist criminology and criminal justice teaching from research-active staff, this course encourages you to critically examine the theoretical foundations that underpin applied criminological research. The course also provides formal, comprehensive, multi-disciplinary training in research methodologies and transferable employment related skills, for those interested applying for a PhD and/or planning a professional research career in, for instance, the voluntary, public or private sectors.

The MRes is an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and North West Social Science Doctoral Training Centre (NWSSDTP) recognised foundation course for research training. This is an essential first step if you wish to undertake doctoral research as part of the 1+3 PhD in Criminology programme, which qualifies towards ESRC NWSSDTP funding.

Aims

  • Meet national and regional demands for new research and policy oriented competencies in criminology or socio-legal studies.
  • Provide advanced, systematic and critical knowledge of research methods and theoretical arguments in criminology or socio-legal studies which are at the forefront of the subject area in the context of an vibrant research context.
  • Offer a course integrating a grounding in research methodology with understanding of the implications for policy.
  • Offer students the opportunity for developing their understanding of the key theoretical and epistemological debates within the subject area and to assist them to engage in theoretical debates at an advanced postgraduate level.
  • Provide a formal, comprehensive, multi-disciplinary training for students in research methodology and transferable employment related skills.
  • Prepare students for PhD level research careers in academic life or as professionals in government and voluntary agencies.
  • Contribute to the national need for skilled social science researchers in criminological, socio-legal and related matters.
  • Train students to appreciate the relationship between research on the one hand and the implementation and operation of policy and practice in the implementation of justice.
  • Provide graduates with the tools for further research/study in criminology and/or socio-legal studies.

Special features

This acclaimed course has ESRC recognition as a Foundation Course for Research Training and is an essential step if you wish to progress onto doctoral studies or pursue a career in research in the public or voluntary sectors.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by an interdisciplinary team of experts using a variety of delivery methods: lectures, workshops, student-led presentations and debate, group work and individual research.

Coursework and assessment

Most course units are assessed by 3500 word essay or by essay and presentation.

Course unit details

To meet the requirements of the taught element of the course, all students must take course units totalling 120 credits. This is normally attained with eight 15-credit course units, as listed below, with 60 credits taken each semester.  Students take 5 core units. The availability of individual optional course units is subject to change (due, among other factors, to staff availability to deliver the course units in any given year).  Information that is sent to students in the month of August preceding registration onto the course will clearly state the course units that are available in the academic year ahead.

In addition, students who pass the taught element of the course and who are permitted to progress to the research element of the course, must also submit a dissertation of between 12,000 and 15,000 words worth 60 credits.

Part-time  students take four out of the five compulsory course units in the first year, and then take the other one in year two.  The remaining 60 credits of optional course units are selected and taken accordingly over the two years. 

 Dissertation

  • Supervised summer dissertation of 12-15,000 words. 
  • Part-time master's students undertake a dissertation in the summer months of year two.  Please note that the part-time students can extend their registration for extra 3 months to submit their dissertations in December of their second year, instead of September (you will be advised of the exact date on the second year of the course).

Exit awards

Students who fail to fulfil the requirements to pass the 180 credits necessary to attain the final degree of MRes can leave the course with the award of Postgraduate Diploma by passing 120 credits at the pass mark of 40%, or can qualify for the Postgraduate Certificate by passing 60 credits at the pass mark of 40%.  Students who do not fulfil the criteria for passing the taught element of the course at the Masters' level of 50% will not be permitted to progress to the dissertation element of the course, and will leave the course with the highest award that the credits that have been passed will allow.

Course unit list

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optional
Dissertation (MRes Criminology) LAWS64000 60 Mandatory
Designing Criminological Research LAWS70311 15 Mandatory
Advanced Theoretical Criminology LAWS70501 15 Mandatory
Evaluating Policy & Practice LAWS70542 15 Mandatory
Data Analysis with R & RStudio LAWS70821 15 Mandatory
Qualitative Research Methods LAWS71361 15 Mandatory
Criminology and Mass Violence LAWS61052 15 Optional
International Criminal Law and Justice LAWS70432 15 Optional
Moving on from Crime: Offender Management, Community Reintegration & Desistance LAWS71402 15 Optional

Scholarships and bursaries

The School is offering a number of awards for students applying for masters study. To find out more please visit our  Master's funding opportunity search page .

Facilities

University of Manchester School of Law students are supported by the first-class resources one expects of a top law school. In addition to the networked study spaces at the Williamson Building, students can access the University of Manchester Library, which houses a substantial collection of law books and periodicals, as well as texts to support all the degrees we offer.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: dass@manchester.ac.uk