BAEcon Development Studies and Data Analytics

Year of entry: 2023

Overview

Degree awarded
BAEcon
Duration
3 or 4 years
Typical A-level offer
AAA
Typical contextual A-level offer
AAB
Find out more about contextual admissions.
Refugee/care-experienced offer
Applicants who have been in local authority care for more than three months or have refugee status may be eligible for an offer two grades below the standard requirements.
Find out more about contextual admissions.
Typical International Baccalaureate offer
6,6,6 at Higher level, 36 points overall. Applicants offering Mathematics or Maths Studies at Standard or Higher level must achieve a minimum of grade 5. Applicants taking English Language A must achieve grade 4 at Higher or Standard level. Applicants offering English Language B must achieve grade 5 at Higher level and grade 6 at Standard level.

Changes to International Baccalaureate Diploma Mathematics Courses from September 2019, first examination 2021. We are aware of the planned changes to the IB Mathematics curriculum. IB students will be able to choose from: Mathematics: analysis and approaches and Mathematics: applications and interpretation from September 2019.

For this programme of study we will accept: Mathematics: analysis and approaches or Mathematics: applications and interpretation at SL or HL and students must achieve a minimum of Grade 5.

Full entry requirements

How to apply
Apply through UCAS

Course overview

  • Gain an all-round understanding of development issues with economics and social sciences course units.
  • Work on real-world research issues and gain practical skills and experience using a range of exciting datasets.
  • Specialise in either development studies, economics, or jointly with other social sciences.
  • Enjoy the opportunity to study abroad or complete a professional placement.

Open days

We are pleased to announce that we are returning to hosting on-campus open days in the summer and autumn.

Please see open days for the dates, registration, and other information.

If you're a prospective student, you can also find out more about student life by chatting with our student ambassadors at a time that suits you, and ask any questions you may have about life at Manchester. 

Please check our Coronavirus FAQs for the most up to date information regarding events. 

You can also look at our virtual open day content to help you learn more about the University.

Fees

Tuition fees for home students commencing their studies in September 2023 will be £9,250 per annum. Tuition fees for international students will be £27,500 per annum. For general information please see the undergraduate finance pages.

Additional expenses

Unavoidable additional costs totalling more than 1% of the annual home undergraduate fee per annum will be made clear to you at the point of application.

Further information can be found in the University's Policy on additional costs incurred by students on undergraduate and postgraduate taught programmes (PDF document, 91KB).

Policy on additional costs

All students should normally be able to complete their programme of study without incurring additional study costs over and above the tuition fee for that programme. Any unavoidable additional compulsory costs totalling more than 1% of the annual home undergraduate fee per annum, regardless of whether the programme in question is undergraduate or postgraduate taught, will be made clear to you at the point of application. Further information can be found in the University's Policy on additional costs incurred by students on undergraduate and postgraduate taught programmes (PDF document, 91KB).

Scholarships/sponsorships

Scholarships and bursaries, including the Manchester Bursary , are available to eligible home/EU students.

Some undergraduate UK students will receive bursaries of up to £2,000 per year, in addition to the government package of maintenance grants.

You can get information and advice on student finance to help you manage your money.

Contact details

School/Faculty
School of Social Sciences
Contact name
School of Social Sciences Admissions Office
Telephone
+44 (0) 161 543 4029
Email
Website
https://www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/social-statistics/
School/Faculty overview

Courses in related subject areas

Use the links below to view lists of courses in related subject areas.

Compare this course

Entry requirements

A-level

  • AAA
  • We do not accept two A/S Levels grades in place of one A-level.
  • Applicants must be studying at least one of the following A-level subjects: Accounting, Anthropology, Business Studies, Classics, Economics, English Language/Literature, Further Mathematics, Geography, History, Law, Mathematics, Modern Languages, Philosophy, Politics, Psychology, Religious Studies, Sociology, Use of Mathematics and World Development.
  • We accept native language A Levels providing they are taken in the same sitting as your other subjects. We will not accept the combination of Mathematics, Further Mathematics and a native language.
  • We accept the Level 3 Diploma in Financial Studies (DipFS) as equivalent to an A-level if taken alongside two full A-levels from the list of acceptable subjects above.

AS-level

AS level results are not considered as part of the standard admissions process at The University of Manchester.

Unit grade information

The University of Manchester welcomes the provision of unit information where available. Like all other information provided by applicants this may be taken into consideration when assessing your application. Unit grades will not normally form part of an offer conditions.

GCSE

Applicants must demonstrate a broad general education including acceptable levels of Literacy and Numeracy, equivalent to at least Grade C or 4 in GCSE/iGCSE English Language and Grade B or 6 in GCSE/iGCSE Mathematics. GCSE/iGCSE English Literature will not be accepted in lieu of GCSE/iGCSE English Language.

International Baccalaureate

6,6,6 at Higher level, 36 points overall. Applicants offering Mathematics or Maths Studies at Standard or Higher level must achieve a minimum of grade 5. Applicants taking English Language A must achieve grade 4 at Higher or Standard level. Applicants offering English Language B must achieve grade 5 at Higher level and grade 6 at Standard level.

Changes to International Baccalaureate Diploma Mathematics Courses from September 2019, first examination 2021. We are aware of the planned changes to the IB Mathematics curriculum. IB students will be able to choose from: Mathematics: analysis and approaches and Mathematics: applications and interpretation from September 2019.

For this programme of study we will accept: Mathematics: analysis and approaches or Mathematics: applications and interpretation at SL or HL and students must achieve a minimum of Grade 5.

Other international entry requirements

Other international entry requirements

We accept a range of qualifications from different countries. For detailed information please refer to our  country-specific requirements and requirements for foundation years  .

For general requirements not listed above see   Accepted entry qualifications from your country  .

Still need help? Email us at   socialsciences@manchester.ac.uk  .

Scottish requirements

Scottish requirements

We typically ask for grades of AAABB in Scottish Highers. In addition, we accept Scottish Advanced Highers and Highers in one of the following combinations:

Three Advanced Highers at grades AAB.

or

Two Advanced Highers at grades AA, plus two additional Highers at grades BB.

Applicants taking a different combination of Highers and Advanced Highers should contact  socialsciences@manchester.ac.uk  for further advice. Applicants not taking English language or Mathematics at Higher level must achieve grade C in English language and Grade B in Mathematics at SCQF Level 5.

Welsh Baccalaureate

Welsh Baccalaureate

The University welcomes and recognises the value of the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma/Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate and usually requires two A Levels or equivalent to be included within this. We consider the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma/Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate as equivalent to an A-level on a grade-for-grade basis.

European Baccalaureate

European BaccalaureateThe University of Manchester welcomes applicants with the European Baccalaureate. Acceptable on its own or in combination with other qualifications, applications from students studying for this qualification are welcome and all applicants will be considered on an individual basis.

We typically require 85% overall in European Baccalaureate with a minimum of 80% in English Language.

AQA Baccalaureate

AQA BaccalaureateThe University recognises the benefits of the AQA Baccalaureate and the opportunities it provides for applicants to develop independent study and research skills.

In making offers, the University will focus on the three A Levels taken within the AQA Baccalaureate. Students need to check the standard A Level requirements for their chosen course.

The units of broader study, enrichment activities and the Extended Project are considered to be valuable elements of the AQA Baccalaureate and we would therefore strongly encourage students to draw upon these experiences within their personal statement.

Foundation year

Foundation year

The University recognises a number of foundation programmes as suitable for entry to this undergraduate programme:

Applicants completing the INTO Manchester in partnership with The University of Manchester international foundation programme are required to achieve AAA in academic subjects and grade B in the EAP with writing and speaking grade B and listening and reading grade C.

Applicants completing the NCUK International Foundation year are required to achieve AAA in academic subjects and grade B in the EAP with writing and speaking grade B and listening and reading grade C.

For all other foundation programmes please see our full  list of approved UK foundation programmes  .

Pearson BTEC qualifications

The School accepts Pearson BTEC Level 3 qualifications for entry as long as it is in a relevant subject and taken alongside A-levels. The A-level you are taking must be included in the list of subjects found in the A-level entry requirements above.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma  - accepted with grades  DDM  in combination with an  A-level at grade A  in a different subject area to the diploma.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma  - accepted with grades  D*D  in combination with an  A-level at grade A  in a different subject area to the diploma.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Foundation Diploma  - accepted with grade  M  in combination with  two A-levels at grade AA  in different subject areas to the diploma.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate  - accepted with grade  in combination with  two A-levels at grade AA  in different subject areas to the diploma.

We do not accept the Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Certificate.

The University of Manchester welcomes applications from students who have achieved legacy BTEC qualifications (pre-2016) such as the BTEC Extended Diploma, BTEC Diploma and BTEC Subsidiary Diploma. The grades required are likely to be the same or vary similar to the new BTEC qualifications (first teaching 2016, awarded 2018). Please contact the Academic School for clarification.

OCR Cambridge Technical qualifications

The School accepts OCR Cambridge Technical (CTEC) Level 3 qualifications for entry as long as it is in a relevant subject and taken alongside A-levels. The A-level you are taking must be included in the list of subjects found in the A-level entry requirements above.

Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma  - accepted with grades  DDM  in combination with an  A-level at grade A  in a different subject area to the diploma.

Cambridge Technical Diploma -  accepted with grades  D*D  in combination with an  A-level at grade A  in a different subject area to the diploma.

Cambridge Technical Foundation Diploma  - accepted with grades  MM  in combination with  two A-levels at grade AA  in different subject areas to the diploma.

Cambridge Technical Extended Certificate  - accepted with grade  D  in combination with  two A-levels at grade AA  in different subject areas to the diploma.

We do not accept the Cambridge Technical Certificate.

The University of Manchester welcomes applications from students who have achieved legacy CTEC qualifications (pre-2016) such as the CTEC Extended Diploma, CTEC Diploma, and CTEC Subsidiary Diploma.  The grades required are likely to be the same or vary similar to the new CTEC qualifications (first teaching 2016, awarded 2018). Please contact the Academic School for clarification.

Access to HE Diploma

Access to HE Diploma

We require a QAA-recognised Access to HE Diploma (a minimum of 60 credits overall with at least 45 at Level 3), with merit or distinction in a subject area relevant to the chosen course.

  • Typical applicant - A mature student returning to education after a number of years.
  • Typical offer - Pass Access to HE Diploma with 45 level 3 credits (45 Distinctions).
  • Minimum Grade C or 4 in GCSE/iGCSE English Language and Grade B or 6 in GCSE/iGCSE Mathematics.

Cambridge Pre-U

Cambridge Pre-UApplicants are expected to achieve D3, D3, D3 in the Cambridge Pre-U. Applicants can either take three Pre-U qualifications or study them in conjunction with A Level subjects.

Extended Project Qualification (EPQ)

Extended Project Qualification (EPQ)The University recognises the benefits of the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) and the opportunities it provides for applicants to develop independent study and research skills. Although the Extended Project will not be included in the conditions of your offer, we strongly encourage you to provide information about the EPQ in your personal statement and at interview. A number of our academic Schools may also choose to take your performance in the EPQ into account should places be available in August for applicants who narrowly miss the entry grades for their chosen course.

Core Maths

Core Maths

The University welcomes and recognises the value of Level 3 core mathematics qualifications (e.g. AQA Certificate in Mathematical Studies). 

Core Mathematics is not a compulsory element of post-16 study and as a result we will not normally include it in the conditions of any offer made to the student.

A Core Maths qualification does not satisfy the requirement of achieving A-level Mathematics for the School of Social Sciences.

Home-schooled applicants

If you have followed a non-standard educational route and have been, for example, educated at home, your application will be considered against the standard entry criteria of the course to which you applied. You will be required to demonstrate that you meet the academic entry requirements as specified for the course. We will also require a reference which should be written by somebody who knows you well enough, in an official capacity, to write about you and your suitability for higher education. Please refer to UCAS for further information: UCAS reference guidelines

English language

All applicants to the University (from the UK and Overseas) are required to show evidence of English Language proficiency. The minimum English Language requirement for this course is either:
  • GCSE/iGCSE English Language grade C.
  • IELTS 6.5 overall with no lower than 6 in any component.
  • TOEFL (IBT) 92 overall with minimum of 21 in listening and speaking, 22 in reading and 23 in speaking.
  • iGCSE English (Second Language) grade B.
  • An acceptable equivalent qualification.

The UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) requires that every student from outside the UK and the EU must show evidence of a minimum level of English Language in order to be granted a UK visa (Tier 4 visa) to study at undergraduate or postgraduate level. This level is often referred to as the 'B2 level'.

Additionally, our individual Schools may ask for specific English Language proficiency levels that are necessary for their academic programmes. In most cases these requirements are likely to be higher than the B2 level. Further information about our English Language policy, including a list of some of the English Language qualifications we accept, can be found here

English language test validity

Some English Language test results are only valid for two years. Your English Language test report must be valid on the start date of the course.

Application and selection

How to apply

Apply through UCAS

Advice to applicants

Applicants submitting mitigating circumstances

If you are submitting information about mitigating circumstances that have affected, or are likely to affect, your academic performance, you should include this in the referee's report.

We cannot take into account information that is supplied after an adverse decision has been made on an application.

(Examples of mitigating circumstances include family illness, problems with school facilities or an unusual curriculum followed by your school of college).

How your application is considered

Applications are considered on the basis of an assessment of past and predicted academic achievements, the academic reference and personal statement.

Returning to education

We welcome applications from anyone who is returning to education.

Overseas (non-UK) applicants

Applicants classed as international students who are studying Foundation Year Programmes, will be considered on the basis they have completed their High School education in full.

Please see our list of approved UK foundation programmes and entry requirements for more information. We also accept a number of qualifications from around the globe. For further information please see our country-specific information pages.

If you still need help please email us socialsciences@manchester.ac.uk

Deferrals

Applications for deferred entry are considered equally to other applications up to the point of confirmation. Deferred entry is granted on the discretion of admissions staff, and is normally granted for one year only.

NB Some English Language test results, such as IELTS of TOEFL, are only valid from two years from the test date.

Re-applications

If you applied in the previous year and your application was not successful you can apply again. Your application will be considered against the standard course entry criteria for that year of entry.

In your new application you should demonstrate how your application has improved. We may refer back to previous applications or registrations at the University.

If you are applying for a place for the same year of entry through UCAS Extra, you should include additional evidence of your suitability for the course.

If you are applying through clearing you will need to meet the clearing requirements. In both UCAS Extra and clearing places will be subject to availability.

Course details

Course description

The BA(Econ) course is an interdisciplinary course that allows you to not only specialise in Economics, but also supplement with other social science subjects such as philosophy, politics and sociology.

You have the flexibility to delve into technical units in Economics such as Econometrics and Mathematical Economics or combine Economics units covering inequality and climate change with social science units to develop a well-rounded understanding on social issues.

The Development Studies pathway is taught by experts in Economics, Politics, Sociology, Social Anthropology, and Social Statistics, and the course offers a rich and coherent basis for understanding the processes and solutions to the problems of development.

It is an interdisciplinary field of study concerned with the issues, problems and policy options facing the development world, such as:

  • inequality;
  • poverty;
  • hunger;
  • wellbeing.

Data Analytics uses data such as numbers, text, sounds, images, memories or experiences to study human behaviour and social environments.

We use data to ask questions about business environments, the ways they function and their impact. You will be able to understand and apply central concepts in Data Analytics, including the theory and method involved in using quantitative data in social science research.

You will be able to take a critical approach to data sources and understand their strengths and weaknesses. You'll also be able to demonstrate to employers that you have skills in complex problem solving, research, and making sense of statistical information in the workplace.

After your first year, you can switch to a different pathway should you discover interests in other social sciences.

Special features

Leading research

World-leading research and teaching in economics has been at the heart of higher education in Manchester since the early days of the University.

Manchester professor William Stanley Jevons (1835 to 1882) helped build the foundations of modern economics.

Three winners of the Nobel Prize in Economics have worked at Manchester:

  • Sir John Hicks (1904 to 1989) wrote his most important works on welfare economics during his time at Manchester.
  • Sir Arthur Lewis (1915 to 1991) for his pioneering work in development economics.
  • Joseph Stiglitz (Nobel Prize winner 2001) has led the Brooks World Poverty Institute.

We are proud to be a leading centre for economic research, scholarship and research-led teaching in all areas of the discipline, including microeconomics, macroeconomics, econometrics, financial economics, environmental and resource economics, development economics and industrial/business economics.

Study abroad

You can apply in Year 2 to spend a year abroad in Year 3. If successful, you will put together a programme of study at the host university in consultation with your Academic Exchange Advisor, to complement your studies at Manchester.

Professional Experience Year Opportunity

You apply in year 1 to boost your employability through a paid Professional Experience Year.

If you meet the criteria, the Professional Experience Team and Careers Service will work with you to find a suitable placement in your 2nd year.

You will then complete your Professional Experience Year in 3rd year extending your degree to four years, before returning to University to finish your final year.

Your degree title will be extended to include 'with Professional Experience', giving you the added advantage of relevant work experience when entering the competitive graduate jobs market.

Teaching and learning

Course units feature formal lectures supported by smaller tutorials or seminars, where you explore the contents of lectures and recommended reading in greater depth. 

Tutorials and seminars are key in improving your written and oral communication skills through group discussions, essay-writing, and presentations. 

You are assigned an Academic Advisor who takes a friendly interest in your progress, and can advise you on selecting course units and career opportunities.

Coursework and assessment

The way that you study and are assessed will depend on which course units you choose. Our methods are designed to promote in-depth learning and understanding, including: 

  • essays, coursework, and other mid-term evaluations; 
  • dissertations; 
  • presentations; 
  • group projects; 
  • exams.

Course content for year 1

Year 1 gives you a broad introduction to Economics and Social Sciences. This will help you decide what to study in Years 2 and 3.

In Year 1, you would take 120 credits overall made up of:

  • 40 credits of Economics;
  • 20 credits of either Introductory or Advanced Mathematics/Statistics (depending on your A-level qualifications or equivalent);
  • 10 credits of an introductory unit in Social Sciences;
  • 40 credits from a list of Social Sciences optional units;
  • Remaining 10 credits from Economics or Social Sciences, or Study Skills.

At the end of your Year 1, you would have an option to switch to a different pathway.

Course units for year 1

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optional
Microeconomics 2 ECON10232 10 Mandatory
Macroeconomics 1 ECON10241 10 Mandatory
Macroeconomics 2 ECON10262 10 Mandatory
Microeconomics 1 ECON10331 10 Mandatory
Power and Value: Perspectives from Social Sciences SOCS15001 10 Mandatory
Applied Statistics for Social Scientists SOST10142 20 Mandatory
Fundamentals of Finance BMAN10552 10 Optional
Fundamentals of Financial Reporting A BMAN10621A 10 Optional
An Introduction to Development Studies ECON10002 10 Optional
Introductory Mathematics ECON10061 10 Optional
Advanced Mathematics ECON10071A 10 Optional
Advanced Statistics ECON10072A 10 Optional
Computing for Social Scientists ECON10151 10 Optional
Introduction to Mathematical Economics ECON10192 10 Optional
Economic History ECON10212 10 Optional
Introduction to Ethics PHIL10021 20 Optional
Critical Thinking PHIL10042 20 Optional
Ancient Greek Philosophy PHIL10122 20 Optional
Introduction to Metaphysics and Epistemology PHIL10622 20 Optional
Introduction to Philosophy of Mind PHIL10631 20 Optional
Introduction to Comparative Politics POLI10201 20 Optional
Introduction to Comparative Politics POLI10202 20 Optional
Making Sense of Politics POLI10301 20 Optional
British Politics: Power and the State POLI10401 20 Optional
Politics of the Global Economy POLI10502 20 Optional
Introduction to International Politics POLI10601 20 Optional
Introduction to Political Theory POLI10702 20 Optional
Power and Culture: Inequality in Everyday Life SOAN10301 10 Optional
Cultural Diversity in Global Perspective SOAN10312 10 Optional
Key Ideas in Social Anthropology SOAN10321 10 Optional
Intro to Ethnographic Reading SOAN10322 10 Optional
Introduction to Business Anthropology: Consumers, Companies and Culture SOAN10361 20 Optional
Environment and Society SOCY10202 20 Optional
Inequalities in Contemporary British Society SOCY10401 20 Optional
Contested Foundations of Social Thought SOCY10421 20 Optional
Contemporary Social Thought SOCY10432 20 Optional
Media, Culture & Society SOCY10441 20 Optional
Global Social Challenges SOCY10461 20 Optional
Getting Personal: Intimacy and Connectedness in Everyday Life SOCY10471 20 Optional
Getting Personal: Intimacy and Connectedness in Everyday Life SOCY10472 20 Optional
Work, Organisations and Society SOCY10912 20 Optional
Understanding Social Media SOST10012 20 Optional
Measuring Inequalities (Unequal Societies) SOST10021 20 Optional
Introductory Statistics for Economists SOST10062 10 Optional
Applied Statistics for Social Scientists SOST10142 20 Optional
Displaying 10 of 45 course units for year 1

Course content for year 2

In Year 2 you study your chosen pathway in depth and take 120 credits over the year.

Single pathway

If you specialise in one pathway, you can take a maximum of 80 credits in that single pathway and up to 40 credits from other pathways from the BA(Econ).

Joint pathway

If you specialise on a joint pathway, you also take a maximum of 80 credits in any one pathway, but you have the freedom to split these between the two disciplines depending on what you would like to study.

To specialise in Development Studies, you will be taking compulsory units in Development Economics, as well as a 20-credit optional Social Sciences unit on a topic of development, such as the Politics of Development or Political and Economic Anthropology (the list is subject to change). You will also be taking compulsory units in Data Analytics which include survey designs and statistical models.

Free choice units

You can also take up to 20 credits from across the University. For example:

Course units for year 2

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optional
Development Economics: Growth, Capital Accumulation and Structural Change ECON20321 10 Mandatory
Development Economics: Understanding Poverty ECON20332 10 Mandatory
Essentials of survey design and analysis SOST20022 20 Mandatory
Answering Social Research Questions with Statistical Models SOST20131 20 Mandatory
Fundamentals of Finance BMAN10552 10 Optional
Fundamentals of Financial Reporting A BMAN10621A 10 Optional
Fundamentals of Management Accounting BMAN10632 10 Optional
Financial Statement Analysis BMAN20081 10 Optional
Financial Markets and Institutions BMAN21011 10 Optional
Financial Reporting and Accountability BMAN21020A 20 Optional
Foundations of Finance A BMAN23000 20 Optional
Foundations of Finance A BMAN23000A 20 Optional
Business Law 1: Law, Business Liabilities and the Consumer BMAN24042 10 Optional
An Introduction to Development Studies ECON10002 10 Optional
Economic History ECON20212 10 Optional
Formal Logic PHIL20142 20 Optional
Ethics PHIL20231 20 Optional
20th Century Analytical Philosophy PHIL20242 20 Optional
Existentialism PHIL23002 20 Optional
Hegel and Marx PHIL23022 20 Optional
Introduction to Political Theory POLI10702 20 Optional
The Politics of (in)Security POLI20332 20 Optional
Questions About International Politics POLI20521 20 Optional
Arguing About Politics: Political Theory in the World POLI20602 20 Optional
The Politics of Globalisation POLI20711 20 Optional
The Politics of Development POLI20722 20 Optional
Gender and Politics in Comparative Perspective POLI20742 20 Optional
The Politics of Policy Making POLI20802 20 Optional
Ideals of Social Justice POLI20881 20 Optional
Environmental Politics POLI20982 20 Optional
Comparative West European Politics POLI21001 20 Optional
Southern European Politics POLI21012 20 Optional
Asia-Pacific Security POLI21041 20 Optional
Anthropology of Kinship, Gender and Sex SOAN20802 20 Optional
Anthropology of Religion SOAN20811 20 Optional
Political and Economic Anthropology SOAN20821 20 Optional
Materiality and Representation SOAN20852 20 Optional
Contested Foundations of Social Thought SOCY10421 20 Optional
Contemporary Social Thought SOCY10432 20 Optional
Work, Economy and Society SOCY20031 20 Optional
Education and Society SOCY20052 20 Optional
Qualitative Research Design & Methods SOCY20091 20 Optional
Sustainability, Consumption & Global Responsibilities SOCY20231 20 Optional
Family, Relationships and Everyday Life SOCY20701 20 Optional
Essentials of survey design and analysis SOST20022 20 Optional
Market Research SOST20042 10 Optional
Applied Statistics for Social Scientists SOST20142 20 Optional
Displaying 10 of 47 course units for year 2

Course content for year 3

In Year 3 you take 120 credits depending on your chosen pathway.

Single pathway

If you choose to specialise in a single pathway such as Development Studies, you can take a minimum of 80 credits in that single area and up to 40 credits from other pathways from the BA (Econ).

Joint pathway

If you specialise on a joint pathway, you will choose a selection of modules in each of the two pathways to fulfil your credit requirements. You will also have an option to do a Development Studies Dissertation where you will be working with a supervisor from either Economics, Politics or Sociology to develop your own thesis.

Free choice units

You can also take up to 20 credits from across the University. For example:

Course units for year 3

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optional
Data Science Modelling SOST30062 20 Mandatory
Quantitative Evaluation (of Policies, Interventions and Experiments) SOST30172 20 Mandatory
Share Prices and Accounting Information BMAN30071 10 Optional
Financial Derivatives BMAN30091 10 Optional
Advanced Corporate Finance BMAN30111A 20 Optional
Accountability and Auditing BMAN30131 10 Optional
Corporate Governance in Context BMAN30211 10 Optional
Financial Engineering BMAN30242 10 Optional
Corporate Contracting and Managerial Behaviour BMAN30702 10 Optional
Case Studies In Digital Transformation BMAN32051 10 Optional
Topics in Inequality & Poverty ECON30041 20 Optional
The Chinese Economy ECON30102 10 Optional
Natural Resource Economics ECON30232 10 Optional
Topics in Development Economics ECON30451 20 Optional
Topics in Economic History ECON30511 20 Optional
Money, Banking & Financial Markets ECON30852 10 Optional
Development Studies Dissertation ECON30910 20 Optional
Climate Change Economics and Policy ECON32111 10 Optional
Public Economics ECON32121 10 Optional
International Trade and Policy ECON32191 20 Optional
Health Economics ECON32202 10 Optional
The Politics of Globalisation POLI20711 20 Optional
The Politics of Development POLI20722 20 Optional
Ideals of Social Justice POLI20881 20 Optional
Intersectional Political Economy POLI30201 20 Optional
Dimensions of Peace and Conflict: Disciplinary and Regional Approaches POLI30262 20 Optional
Chinese Politics POLI30281 20 Optional
Dissertation B POLI30380 20 Optional
Introduction to International Political Economy POLI30721 20 Optional
Gender, War & Militarism POLI30791 20 Optional
War Memories and Reconciliation in East Asia POLI31011 20 Optional
Children, Family and Social Justice POLI31032 20 Optional
Postcolonial Politics POLI32061 20 Optional
Political and Economic Anthropology SOAN20821 20 Optional
Anthropology of Development and Humanitarianism SOAN30111 20 Optional
Anthropology of the Arctic SOAN30241 20 Optional
Black Identities and Cultures in Latin America SOAN30661 20 Optional
Dissertation (20 credits) SOCY30920 20 Optional
Theory & Method in Demography SOST30012 20 Optional
Advanced Social Network Analysis SOST30022 20 Optional
Displaying 10 of 40 course units for year 3

Course content for year 4

If you are selected to take up the Professional Experience opportunity in Year 3, then you will take Year 3 Course Content in Year 4.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: dass@manchester.ac.uk

Careers

Career opportunities

The University of Manchester has an excellent reputation for employability, and we are one of the most targeted universities by the nation's top employers (The Graduate Market in 2021, High Fliers Research).

Our graduates pursue a variety of careers including journalism and media, charities, consultancy, civil service, finance, marketing, social work, teaching, law and postgraduate study.

Recent graduates have gone on to work at:

  • Ernst and Young;
  • PricewaterhouseCoopers;
  • Grant Thornton;
  • Bank of New York;
  • Credit Suisse;
  • National Audit Office;
  • Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs;
  • Department of Health;
  • FSA;
  • Government Economics Service;
  • the BBC.

The University has its own dedicated Careers Service that you would have full access to as a student and for two years after you graduate. At Manchester you will have access to a number of opportunities to help boost your employability .

We work with students and the Careers Service to embed employability into our courses through careers and networking events.

You can also boost your employability by choosing course units in Year 2 from the University College for Interdisciplinary Learning .

Find out more on the careers and employability page.