BASS Social Anthropology and Data Analytics

Year of entry: 2023

Course unit details:
Racism and Ethnicity in the UK

Course unit fact file
Unit code SOCY20961
Credit rating 20
Unit level Level 2
Teaching period(s) Semester 1
Offered by Sociology
Available as a free choice unit? Yes

Overview

This course introduces students to the sociology of racism and ethnicity, using the UK experience as a case study. It explores the origins and development of racism within Britain, examining how processes of racialization have shaped and continue to shape the nature of British society. We look at the role ‘race’ has played in the production of inequalities and exclusions, as well as how it informs notions of national identity. We also explore how race interacts with class, gender and other intersections. The course engages with contemporary debates and theoretical advances. The module aims to:

• Provide an introduction to theorisations of racism and racialization

• Introduce students to the ways in which Racism and Ethnicity interact with other forms of social difference such as nation, gender, class, and religion.

• Encourage students to evaluate the role of racism in the structure of British society.

• Explore current theoretical debates around key issues and contemporary events.

Aims

• To provide an introduction to theorisations of racism and racialization

• To introduce students to the ways in which Racism and Ethnicity interact with other forms of social difference such as nation, gender, class, and religion.

• To encourage students to evaluate the role of racism in the structure of British society.

• To explore current theoretical debates around key issues and contemporary events.

Learning outcomes

On completion of the course students will be expected to:

• Have knowledge of a range of theoretical tools to understand contemporary debates about ’race’, ethnicity and difference.

• Understand the relationship between ’race’, ethnicity and other forms of social difference.

• To critically engage with key texts and theoretical ideas.

• Demonstrate an awareness of the role of ’racism’ in the structure of British society.

• Have a critical understanding of contemporary developments in the sociology of racism and ethnicity in the UK.

Teaching and learning methods

Lecture-style material will be delivered weekly through a mix of up to one hour pre-recorded (i.e. asynchronous) content and one hour live (i.e. synchronous) lecturer-led classes. Additionally, weekly one hour small-group tutorials will be delivered on-campus as long as government guidelines allow, otherwise they will be delivered online

Assessment methods

Method Weight
Written exam 50%
Written assignment (inc essay) 50%

Feedback methods

All sociology courses include both formative feedback – which lets you know how you’re getting on and what you could do to improve – and summative feedback – which gives you a mark for your assessed work.

Recommended reading

Anthias, F. and Yuval-Davis, N. (1992) Racialized Boundaries: Race, nation, gender, colour and class and the anti-racist struggle, London: Routledge.

Bhattacharyya, G. Elliott-Cooper, A., Balan, S., Nişancıoğlu, K. Koram, K., Gebrial, D., El-Enany, N., and de Noronha, L. (2021). Empire’s Endgame: Racism and the British State, London: Pluto Press

Back, L. and Solomos, J. (eds.) (2009) Theories of Race and Racism: A Reader, London: Routledge.

Garner, S. (2017) Racisms: An Introduction (Second Edition), London: Sage (highly recommended).

Gilroy, P. (1987) There Ain’t No Black in the Union Jack, London: Hutchinson.

Meer, N. (2014) Key Concepts in Race and Ethnicity, London: Sage.

Rattansi, A. (2007) Racism: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Study hours

Scheduled activity hours
Assessment written exam 2
Lectures 20
Tutorials 10
Independent study hours
Independent study 168

Teaching staff

Staff member Role
Remi Joseph-Salisbury Unit coordinator

Additional notes

 

  • One compulsory non-assessed essay plan; 5 point penalty for non-submission
  • One assessed coursework essay; 2000 words; 50% of final mark
  • One online, open book exam (answer 2 questions; guide 1000 words per answer); 50% of final mark.

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