BSc Global Development with International Study

Year of entry: 2024

Overview

Degree awarded
Bachelor of Science (Honours)
Duration
4 years full-time
Typical A-level offer
AAA
Typical contextual A-level offer

ABB

Find out more about contextual admissions.
Refugee/care-experienced offer

Applicants who have been in local authority care for more than three months or have refugee status may be eligible for an offer three grades below the standard requirements.

Find out more about contextual admissions.
Typical International Baccalaureate offer
36 points overall. 6, 6, 6 in higher-level subjects.

We are aware of the planned changes to the IB Mathematics curriculum. IB students will be able to choose from Mathematics: analysis and approaches and Mathematics: applications and interpretation from September 2019.

Applicants studying the International Baccalaureate Career Related Programme (IBCP) should contact the academic School prior to applying so that their academic profile can be considered.

Full entry requirements

How to apply
Apply through UCAS .
UCAS course code
L906
UCAS institution code
M20

Course overview

  • We're ranked 7th in the world for development studies (QS World University Rankings by Subject 2023).
  • Focus on the social, economic and environmental challenges faced by the Global South and explore connections with the developed world in the Global North.
  • Study abroad opportunity
  • 85% of our research outputs are either ‘world-leading' or ‘internationally excellent' (Research Excellence Framework 2021), meaning that you will be taught by world-leading experts in their fields.
  • Benefit from an impressive history of development studies at Manchester of over 60 years - we have educated more than 10,000 students from across the world who now help drive forward sustainable development and social justice for all.
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Study BSc Global Development

Open days

We are pleased to announce that we are returning to hosting on-campus open days in the summer and autumn.

Please see open days for the dates, registration, and other information.

If you're a prospective student, you can also find out more about student life by chatting with our student ambassadors at a time that suits you, and ask any questions you may have about life at Manchester.

Please check our Coronavirus FAQs for the most up to date information regarding events.

You can also look at our virtual open day content to help you learn more about the University.

Fees

Tuition fees for home students commencing their studies in September 2024 will be £9,250 per annum. Tuition fees for international students will be £28,000 per annum. For general information please see the undergraduate finance pages.

Policy on additional costs

All students should normally be able to complete their programme of study without incurring additional study costs over and above the tuition fee for that programme. Any unavoidable additional compulsory costs totalling more than 1% of the annual home undergraduate fee per annum, regardless of whether the programme in question is undergraduate or postgraduate taught, will be made clear to you at the point of application. Further information can be found in the University's Policy on additional costs incurred by students on undergraduate and postgraduate taught programmes (PDF document, 91KB).

Scholarships/sponsorships

We are committed to attracting and supporting the very best students from all backgrounds to study this course.

You could be eligible for cash bursaries of up to £3,000 to support your studies.

Find out about our funding opportunities .

Contact details

School/Faculty
School of Environment, Education and Development
School/Faculty overview
See: The School .

Courses in related subject areas

Use the links below to view lists of courses in related subject areas.

Entry requirements

A-level

AAA

A mixture of science or maths and humanities or arts subjects is preferred, but not essential.

We do not require a pass in the Science Practical Assessment.

Contextual offer

Grades ABB including subject specific requirements for applicants who meet our contextual offer criteria.  For further information and to check eligibility visit our  Contextual Offers page .

AS-level

AS level results are not considered as part of the standard admissions process at The University of Manchester.

Unit grade information

The University of Manchester welcomes the provision of unit information where available. Like all other information provided by applicants this may be taken into consideration when assessing your application. Unit grades will not normally form part of an offer conditions.

GCSE

Applicants must demonstrate a broad general education including acceptable levels of Literacy and Numeracy, equivalent to at least Grade C or 4 in GCSE/iGCSE English Language and Mathematics. GCSE/iGCSE English Literature will not be accepted in lieu of GCSE/iGCSE English Language.

Please note that if you hold English as a second language iGCSE qualification, we may also require you to offer one of  our acceptable equivalent English Language qualifications  or achieve a higher grade in your iGCSE than the one stated above. Please contact the academic School for clarification.

International Baccalaureate

36 points overall. 6, 6, 6 in higher-level subjects.

We are aware of the planned changes to the IB Mathematics curriculum. IB students will be able to choose from Mathematics: analysis and approaches and Mathematics: applications and interpretation from September 2019.

Applicants studying the International Baccalaureate Career Related Programme (IBCP) should contact the academic School prior to applying so that their academic profile can be considered.

Other international entry requirements

We accept a range of qualifications from different countries. Please see our international entry requirements page for further information.  Accepted entry qualifications from your country

Scottish requirements

We normally require grades  AAAAC or AAABB  in Scottish Highers. 

In addition, Scottish Advanced Highers are normally required in one of the following combinations:

Three Advanced Highers  AAA

or

Two Advanced Highers  AA , plus two additional Higher  AA

English Language and Mathematics not taken at Higher/Advanced Higher must have been achieved at SCQF level 5 (minimum National 5 grade C / Intermediate 2 grade C / Standard Grade Credit level grade 3).

If you require further clarification about the acceptability of this qualification please contact the Academic School(s) you plan to apply to.

Welsh Baccalaureate

The University welcomes and recognises the value of the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma/Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate and usually requires two A Levels or equivalent to be included within this.

We require minimum grade A from the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma/Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate.

If you require further clarification about the acceptability of this qualification please contact the academic School(s) you plan to apply to.

European Baccalaureate

The University of Manchester welcomes applicants with the European Baccalaureate. Acceptable on its own or in combination with other qualifications, applications from students studying for this qualification are welcome and all applicants will be considered on an individual basis.

We normally require 87% overall.

AQA Baccalaureate

The University recognises the benefits of the AQA Baccalaureate and the opportunities it provides for applicants to develop independent study and research skills.

In making offers, the University will focus on the three A Levels taken within the AQA Baccalaureate. Students need to check the standard A Level requirements for their chosen course.

The units of broader study, enrichment activities and the Extended Project are considered to be valuable elements of the AQA Baccalaureate and we would therefore strongly encourage students to draw upon these experiences within their personal statement.

Foundation year

The University recognises a number of foundation programmes as suitable for entry to this undergraduate programme:

Applicants completing the INTO Manchester in partnership with The University of Manchester international foundation programme are required to achieve AAA and an EAP score of   B with B in writing and speaking and C in reading and listening .

Applicants completing the NCUK International Foundation year are required to achieve AAA and an EAP requirements score of   B with B in writing and speaking and C in reading and listening Please note, the NCUK International Foundation Year in Business is not accepted for BA Architecture.

Applicants studying other Foundation programmes should contact the academic School to check if their qualification is recognised for entry to this programme and for specific entry requirements.

Pearson BTEC qualifications

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma

We consider the National Extended Diploma in either Construction or Engineering for entry (we do not accept the above qualification in Art and Design).

Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full National Extended Diploma with grades DDD.

Please note that the National Diploma and the National Extended Certificate must be studied alongside A-levels. We are unable to accept combinations of the BTEC qualification.  

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma

We consider the National Diploma in either Construction or Engineering for entry. Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full National Diploma with grades DD, plus an A-level at grade A.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate

We consider the National Extended Certificate in either Construction or Engineering for entry. Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full National Extended Certificate with grade D, plus two A-levels at grades AA.

OCR Cambridge Technical qualifications

Cambridge Level 3 Technical Extended Diploma (CTEC)

We consider the Technical Extended Diploma for entry provided it is in a subject relevant to the chosen course.

Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full Technical Extended Diploma with grades DDD. 

Cambridge Level 3 Technical Diploma (CTEC)

We consider the Technical Diploma for entry provided it is in a subject relevant to the chosen course. 

Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full Technical Diploma with grades DD, plus an additional level 3 qualification such as an A-level at grade A.

Cambridge Level 3 Technical Foundation Diploma (CTEC)

We consider the Technical Foundation Diploma for entry provided it is in a subject relevant to the chosen course. 

Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full Technical Foundation Diploma with grades DD, plus additional level 3 qualifications such as A-level at grades BB.

Cambridge Level 3 Technical Extended Certificate (CTEC)

We consider the Technical Extended Certificate for entry provided it is in a subject relevant to the chosen course. 

Entry requirements are based on achievement of the full Technical Extended Certificate with grade D, plus additional Level 3 qualifications such as A-levels at grades AA. 

Other

The University of Manchester welcomes applications from students who have achieved legacy CTEC qualifications (pre-2016) such as the CTEC Extended Diploma, CTEC Diploma, CTEC Subsidiary Diploma, and CTEC Certificate.  The grades required are likely to be the same or vary similar to the new CTEC qualifications (first teaching 2016, awarded 2018). Please contact the Academic School for clarification.

If you require further clarification about the acceptability of this qualification please contact the Academic School(s) you plan to apply to.

Access to HE Diploma

We require a QAA-recognised Access to HE Diploma (a minimum of 60 credits overall with at least 45 at Level 3), with merit or distinction in a subject area relevant to the chosen course.

The specific course requirements are a minimum of 60 credits overall with at least 45 at Level 3 and 45 credits at Distinction  .

You must have GCSEs in English and Mathematics at grade C or 4.

Cambridge Pre-U

We consider applicants offering Pre-U Principal Subjects, or a mix of Pre-U and A Level subjects, provided a minimum of three distinct subjects overall is taken.

Candidates taking Pre-U principal subjects are expected to achieve D3, D3, D3. 

Candidates taking Pre-U principal subjects in conjunction with A-levels are expected to achieve a combination of D3 in the Pre-U certificates and grades AA at A-level in three distinct subjects.

T Level

We do not accept T Levels as entry onto this programme. The University does accept T Level qualifications on a number of courses. Please review our  T Level information page  for a full list.

Extended Project Qualification (EPQ)

The University recognises the benefit of the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) and the opportunities it provides for applicants to develop independent study and research skills. We strongly encourage you to provide information about the EPQ in your personal statement and at interview. For this programme, as well as the regular conditions of offer, we may make students who are currently taking or completed the EPQ an alternative offer.  For this course it would be AAB at A-level plus the Extended Project at Grade A.

Core Maths

The University recognises the value of Level 3 Core Mathematics qualifications. Core Mathematics is not a compulsory element of post-16 study and as a result we will not normally include it in the conditions of any offer we make. However, if a student chooses to undertake a core mathematics qualification this may be taken into account when we consider a student's application, particularly for courses with a distinct mathematical or statistical element that does not require A Level Mathematics. Academic Schools may also choose to take a student's performance in Core Mathematics into account should places be available in August for applicants who narrowly miss the entry grades for their chosen course.

Where a course requires applicants to have at least grade 6/B or higher in GCSE Mathematics we would be likely to consider a pass in Core Mathematics at a minimum grade C or B as an alternative way to fulfil this requirement. Where an A Level in Mathematics is required then Core Mathematics will not be accepted in lieu of an A Level.

A Level and GCSE Mathematics requirements for our courses vary according to subject so we advise students to contact the academic School, who will clarify whether a student's portfolio of qualifications is acceptable for entry onto the chosen course.

Home-schooled applicants

If you have followed a non-standard educational route and have been, for example, educated at home, your application will be considered against the standard entry criteria of the course to which you applied. You will be required to demonstrate that you meet the academic entry requirements as specified for the course. We will also require a reference which should be written by somebody who knows you well enough, in an official capacity, to write about you and your suitability for higher education. Please refer to UCAS for further information: UCAS reference guidelines

Non-standard educational routes

Mature students are some of our most well-equipped learners, bringing skills and attributes gained from work, family and other life experiences.  Students come from a whole array of backgrounds, study every kind of course, undertake full-time and part-time learning and are motivated by career intentions as well as personal interest.  There is no such thing as a typical mature student at Manchester.

The application process is the same as for other prospective undergraduates.  If you require further clarification about the acceptability of the qualifications you hold please contact the academic School(s) you plan to apply to.  Further information for mature students can be found here ( http://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/mature-students/ )

English language

All applicants to the University (from the UK and Overseas) are required to show evidence of English Language proficiency. The minimum English Language requirement for this course is either:

  • GCSE/iGCSE English Language grade C/4 , or;
  • IELTS 6.5 overall, with 6.5 in writing and no other sub-section below 6.0, or;
  • An acceptable equivalent qualification.

For details on acceptable equivalent qualifications to this course please see the School of Environment, Education and Development's  English Language information page  .

We do  not  offer Pre-sessional English Language courses for entry onto our undergraduate programmes within the School of Environment, Education and Development.

The UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) requires that every student from outside the UK and the EU must show evidence of a minimum level of English Language in order to be granted a UK visa (Tier 4 visa) to study at undergraduate or postgraduate level. This level is often referred to as the 'B2 level'. Additionally, our individual Schools may ask for specific English Language proficiency levels that are necessary for their academic programmes. In most cases these requirements are likely to be higher than the B2 level. Further information about our English Language policy, including a list of some of the English Language qualifications we accept, can be found  here .

English language test validity

Some English Language test results are only valid for two years. Your English Language test report must be valid on the start date of the course.

Application and selection

How to apply

Apply through UCAS .

Returning to education

Return-to-learn students are those who have had a substantial period away from any formal learning. Often such learners have pursued careers or raised a family. 

We understand that students come from many different backgrounds, with varying qualifications, careers and skills, but they often bring to their studies a high degree of motivation and experience. 

We recognise that standard selection measures and procedures may not enable these learners to demonstrate fully their suitability for their chosen course. 

Where appropriate, admissions officers will seek and consider alternative evidence in order to give such learners equivalent consideration. Where they deem this alternative evidence meets entry criteria fully, the learner will not be required to meet the standard academic entry requirements.

Policy for applicants who resit their qualifications

We will consider applicants who have re-sat individual modules.

If you have re-sat your final examinations, we will consider your application but may require further information in order to make an informed academic judgement on your application.

Re-applications

If you applied in the previous year and your application was not successful, you may apply again. Your application will be considered against the standard course entry criteria for that year of entry.

In your new application, you should demonstrate how your application has improved. We may draw upon all information from your previous applications or any previous registrations at the University as a student when assessing your suitability for your chosen course.

If you are applying for a place for the same year of entry through UCAS Extra, you should provide additional evidence of your suitability for the course.

If you are applying through clearing, you are required to meet the clearing requirements. In both UCAS Extra and clearing the places will be subject to availability.

Course details

Course description

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BSc Global Development Animation 2023

BSc Global Development focuses on the social, economic and environmental challenges faced by the Global South, including Asia and the Pacific, Africa and Latin America. However, the challenges facing peoples, businesses and governments in the Global South cannot be understood without exploring connections with the Global North.

Today’s challenges – such as climate change, inequality, and social justice – cut across global boundaries and require a global perspective.

You will learn how to analyse these issues using different approaches, as the course emphasises insights from a range of interconnected disciplines, particularly geography, politics and economics.

The Global Development Institute addresses global inequalities through world-class, interdisciplinary research, and teaching, in order to promote a socially-just world in which all people, including future generations, can enjoy a decent life. Made up of over 70 academics and around 700 students from around 40 countries, the Global Development Institute is one of the largest and most diverse providers of development studies in Europe.

Special features

Longstanding history

From being a small training unit on the edge of the University, the Global Development Institute now leads one of its major research beacons on global inequalities. With a culmination of impressive history of development studies at Manchester which has spanned over more than 60 years, we have educated more than 10,000 students from across the world who now help drive forward sustainable development and social justice for all.

Watch this video to learn more about our history.

Multiculturalism

The Global Development Institute is one of the largest and most diverse providers of development studies in Europe with around 700 students and over 70 academics from around 40 countries, making it the perfect home for this brand-new undergraduate course for entry 2023.

Global reputation

Ranked 7th in the world for development studies (QS 2023), the Global Development Institute has an outstanding reputation across the globe, meaning that a degree from Manchester will set you up for a bright future within the field of development studies.

Research-informed teaching

The Global Development Institute has recently been awarded for its research impact and quality, with 85% of our research outputs judged as either ‘world-leading' or ‘internationally excellent' (Research Excellence Framework 2021), meaning that you will be taught by world-leading experts in their fields.

Teaching and learning

You will learn through traditional and participatory methods including: 

  • lectures and seminars; 
  • small-group learning; 
  • individual tutorials; 
  • self-study materials; 
  • group collaboration and team work.

Important notice: factors affecting fieldwork and placements

The School of Environment, Education and Development (SEED) recognises the value of fieldwork and placements. However, the safety and wellbeing of our students and staff remains our priority.

The School will assess on a regular basis the viability of any travel and fieldwork and communicate any significant changes to our students at the earliest possible opportunity.

The role of SEED

We will do our best to deliver fieldwork and placements in line with the original programme information given. However, it might become necessary for us to make changes - for example, due to:

  • changes to the rules and guidance on travel and activities implemented and published by the UK and overseas governments;
  • a risk assessment conducted by or on behalf of the University identifying unmanageable risk;
  • changes that enhance the educational value and student experience of the activity;
  • changes to the situation of a placement provider (for example, which cause them to be unable to accept students);
  • the unavailability of appropriate insurance cover;
  • the unavailability of appropriate travel and accommodation and any significant changes to their financial costs.

We will always seek to limit changes to those which are identified as being necessary. Where the proposed activity cannot proceed, we will do our best to offer a suitable alternative and ensure that the intended learning outcomes of the Programme are met.

  • Where fieldwork and placements are a compulsory element of the Programme, they will be replaced with something academically similar.
  • Where a trip or placement is not a compulsory element of the Programme, it may not be replaced.

We will consult with affected students at the earliest possible opportunity and explore the options available to them.

The duty of students

Preparation, attendance and conduct

Attendance at preparatory classes is a compulsory pre-requisite of the fieldwork and placements to ensure safety and learning outcomes are met.

Students who do not attend the compulsory preparatory classes may be prevented from participating in the fieldwork or placement. It is the duty of students to discuss any attendance issues with the field course or placement convenor.

Students are representatives of the university during their fieldwork or placement. Behaviour deemed by the convenor to be unacceptable may result in students being sent home.

Where a student is unable to attend or complete the fieldwork or placement (e.g. due to mitigating circumstances), is prevented from attending due to absence from compulsory preparatory classes, or returned home due to poor conduct:

  • a suitable alternative assessment will be offered (as appropriate) to ensure that the programme ILOs are met, and that the student is not academically disadvantaged; and
  • the University accepts no responsibility for any costs incurred by the student in relation to the fieldwork or placement.

Immigration, passport and visa requirements

It is the responsibility of the individual student to ensure they have:

  • a valid passport to enter the destination country (including sufficient months prior to expiry); and
  • a valid visa (where required) and comply with its requirements.

The School cannot guarantee that visas required for fieldwork or a placement will be granted by the relevant authority. Please note that countries may change their immigration and visa regulations at short notice.

Where a student is unable to attend fieldwork or a placement because they do not have the required visa or passport:

  • a suitable alternative assessment will be offered to ensure that the programme ILOs are met and that the student is not academically disadvantaged; and
  • the University accepts no responsibility for any costs incurred by the student in relation to the fieldwork or placement.

Coursework and assessment

You will be assessed through methods including:

  • essays;
  • team projects;
  • coursework;
  • presentations;
  • dissertation.

Course content for year 1

In your first year, you will learn how insights from different disciplines can be combined to help us understand global development challenges, and how understandings of development have evolved over time. While the course units draw on Western thought, there is also time to study contributions from non-Western writers and cultures.

Course units for year 1

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optional
Skills for Global Development Studies 1 (Qualitative Methods) MGDI10001 20 Mandatory
Current Issues in Global Development 1 MGDI10011 20 Mandatory
History of Thought in Global Development MGDI10021 20 Mandatory
Skills for Global Development Studies 2 (Quantitative Methods) MGDI10032 20 Mandatory
Current Issues in Global Development 2 MGDI10042 20 Mandatory
Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Global Development MGDI10052 20 Mandatory

Course content for year 2

In the second year, you will have the opportunity to specialise based on your interests, for example focusing on environmental, political or economic challenges. There will also be the opportunity to take courses from the University's Humanitarian and Conflict Research Institute, learning more about how communities and organisations respond to natural disasters and violent conflicts. If you prefer, you can keep your options open and continue without choosing a specialism.

Course units for year 2

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optional
Sustainable Global Development MGDI20061 20 Mandatory
Political Economy of Globalisation MGDI20072 20 Mandatory
Climate Change: Science and Society GEOG20091 20 Optional
Everyday Peace Building and Security HCRI20002 20 Optional
Disasters and Development HCRI20011 20 Optional
Rethinking Crisis HCRI20022 20 Optional
Introduction to Global Health HCRI20321 20 Optional
Urban Development in the Global South MGDI20232 20 Optional
Public Economics for the Global South MGDI20242 20 Optional
Intermediate Statistical Methods MGDI20251 20 Optional
Development Microeconomics MGDI20261 20 Optional
Development Macroeconomics MGDI20272 20 Optional
The State and the Political Economy of Development MGDI20281 20 Optional
Climate Change and Biodiversity in a Developing World MGDI20292 20 Optional
Displaying 10 of 14 course units for year 2

Course content for year 3

In your third year, you will normally have the opportunity to study abroad. You will be able to adapt practical skills to a new academic environment and enhance your knowledge of diverse world views and global development issues. Through an international study year you'll be able to enhance your employability by developing an international network of contacts, demonstrate cross-cultural communication skills, cultural awareness, and, depending on the destination, enhanced linguistic abilities

Course content for year 4

In your final year, you will build on the interests that you have developed in year two, choosing from a wide range of optional course units. You will also write a dissertation on a topic in global development, supervised by an individual lecturer who will meet with you one-on-one over the course of the final semester.

Course units for year 4

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

TitleCodeCredit ratingMandatory/optional
Global Development Dissertation MGDI30000 40 Mandatory
Critical Geographies of Difference GEOG30621 20 Optional
Wildlife in the Anthropocene GEOG30702 20 Optional
Global Urban Futures GEOG32042 20 Optional
Disaster Mobilities of Climate Change HCRI30631 20 Optional
Conceptualising the Camp HCRI30651 20 Optional
Sustainability in Action MGDI30301 20 Optional
Global Value Chains and Development MGDI30401 20 Optional
Health Economics in the Global South MGDI30501 20 Optional
Analysing Poverty & Inequality MGDI30601 20 Optional
Further Statistical Methods for Global Development MGDI30802 20 Optional
Digital Technologies for Global Development’ MGDI30902 20 Optional
Displaying 10 of 12 course units for year 4

What our students say

“I chose to study at The University of Manchester because of its position at the forefront of global development studies. I was attracted by the GDI’s famously influential research across the globe and by the opportunity to experience a research-informed approach to learning about international development under the influence of its renowned multi-disciplined body of academic staff. 

I was also drawn to Manchester by its reputation as an exciting, affordable city with a rich cultural heritage and by its position as a great base from which to explore the rest of the UK and Europe.”

Madeleine Cretney, GDI student

Facilities

From being a small training unit on the edge of the University, the Global Development Institute now leads one of its major research beacons on global inequalities. With a culmination of impressive history of development studies at Manchester which has spanned over more than 60 years, we have educated more than 10,000 students from across the world who now help drive forward sustainable development and social justice for all.

What’s more, the Global Development Institute is located in the Arthur Lewis Building, named after the first black Nobel Prize winner and first black professor in the UK, and previous professor of economics at Manchester.

Find out more about our facilities.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: dass@manchester.ac.uk

Careers

Career opportunities

With over 10,000 alumni across the globe, the Global Development Institute has helped launch many careers over the years. We have educated a large number of postgraduate students over recent years and are now launching a brand-new undergraduate course with the focus of building the foundation for a career in the development sector. Our course units have been designed to ensure you graduate with the research and professional skills you need to pursue your chosen career.

Learning in our state-of-the-art classrooms and computer laboratories, the course will equip you with excellent subject knowledge, while also developing your transferrable skills, such as communication, data analysis, research and problem-solving.

What’s more, the Global Development Institute is highly diverse with both students and academics from across the globe, enhancing your intercultural skills – a valuable asset in today’s professional environment.

After your graduation, you will be well equipped for a wide range of positions in the public and private sectors working on developmental issues, including charities, non-governmental organisations, international organisations, governments, policy making, media or politics either in the UK or abroad. What’s more, the Global Development Institute offers over 20 master’s courses, allowing you to delve deeper into your chosen field.

Careers support

The University has its own dedicated  Careers Service   that you would have full access to as a student and for two years after you graduate. At Manchester you will have access to a number of opportunities to help  boost your employability.

Careers support for international students

The Careers Service provide specialist resources, advice and events for international students to help with career planning and making the most of your time while studying in Manchester.

Global networks

The University of Manchester is proud to have the largest  global alumni community   of any campus-based university in the UK. International alumni groups are a great way to keep in touch with fellow Manchester graduates in your country. It is an opportunity to build professional and social networks.