BMidwif Midwifery

Year of entry: 2022

Course unit details:
Midwifery Care for Complex Needs (Postnatal and Neonatal Period)

Unit code NURS21262
Credit rating 20
Unit level Level 2
Teaching period(s) Semester 2
Offered by Nursing & Midwifery
Available as a free choice unit? No

Overview

This unit will combine theoretical and practice-based learning, to enable students, under the close supervision of a midwife, to develop the knowledge, skills & values needed to identify and assess needs and risks and provide appropriate midwifery care for postnatal mothers, babies and families with complex health and social issues. A blended-learning mix of online and campus-based activities including lectures from appropriate specialists, individual activities, workbooks, and directed reading will help equip students with the knowledge and understanding of relevant theory related to more complex postnatal, neonatal and breastfeeding issues. Seminars and small group tutorials will help students to focus on key topics, reflect on clinical learning experiences and apply theory to practice.

Aims

  • Equip students with the knowledge, skills and values needed to be able to assess the needs and risks experiences by postnatal mothers, babies and their families when complex health and social needs are present.
  • Equip student midwives with the knowledge, skills and values they need to participate in the planning, delivery and evaluation of safe and effective midwifery care of postnatal mothers, babies and their families when complex health and social needs are present.

Teaching and learning methods

This unit will combine theory and learning in practice to help students develop a well-informed and skilful approach to identifying and responding to complex postnatal and neonatal concerns. A blended-learning mix of online and campus-based activities including lectures from midwifery, neonatal and mental health specialists, small group seminars and discussions, individual activities, clinical workbooks, and directed reading will help equip students with the knowledge and understanding of relevant theory related to more complex postnatal, neonatal and breastfeeding issues. Seminars and small group tutorials will help students to focus on key topics, reflect on clinical learning experiences and apply theory to practice. An important interprofessional learning day will help students consider the diverse needs of families dealing with serious mental health issues. 

Knowledge and understanding

  • Demonstrate sound knowledge and understanding of pertinent complications (such as secondary postpartum haemorrhage, infection and, perineal trauma) that may affect postnatal women and of the role of the midwife in the assessment, referral and care of those affected.
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the mental health issues that may affect women during the childbearing process and of most appropriate ways for midwives to recognise, and respond to signs and symptoms of these conditions, including critical review of services available to support women.
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the pertinent neonatal conditions that may be encountered by the midwife in the postnatal period and critically evaluate the role of the midwife in the reduction of risk factors that may contribute to preventable neonatal problems, and also recognition, assessment, referral and care of ‘at risk’ neonates and their parents.
  • Identify how the midwife can best support the woman, her partner and wider family during experiences of illness and loss.
  • Demonstrate the knowledge of the factors pre-disposing to child abuse, the impact of abuse on children and families and the skills needed to recognise potential signs of abuse and make an appropriate referral.
  • Understand the potential impact of delivery room practices on the well being of mother and baby, and on the establishment of breastfeeding in particular.
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the common complications of breastfeeding (eg sore nipples & mastitis), how these arise and how women may be helped to overcome them.
  • Identify babies that need a managed approach to feeding; demonstrate knowledge and understanding of appropriate care and discuss the importance of inter-professional working to promote optimal feeding.

Intellectual skills

  • Apply knowledge and understanding gained from other course units to the care of postnatal mothers, babies and their families with complex needs, and explain the rationale for care with reference to up-to-date evidence.
  • Clearly communicate complex information and develop a well-supported argument through small group discussion and written work.
  • Critically evaluate a model of midwifery as the basis for the delivery of appropriate care to families with complex needs.
  • Critically analyse the delivery of postnatal and neonatal care in real-world situations, including the ethics of neonatal care in the 21st Century, in the light of current evidence and views on clinical care

Practical skills

  • Under close supervision, assess the wellbeing of postnatal mothers and neonates with more complex needs and take appropriate action when deviations from the norm are detected.
  • Under close supervision, work with other healthcare professionals to plan and provide appropriate care for sick or at risk mothers and their families, and. sick or pre-term neonates and their families .
  • Demonstrate the ability to maintain a safe environment for new mothers and neonates, including best practice for preventing cross infection.
  • Participate in effective inter-professional communication and team working.

    The learning outcomes below relate to the UNICEF Baby Friendly Initiative:

  • Support mothers who are separated from their babies (for example on admission to the neonatal unit or when returning to work) to initiate and maintain their lactation and to feed their babies optimally.
  • Demonstrate knowledge and skill in relation to alternative methods of infant feeding and care that may be used when breastfeeding is not possible, and that will enhance the likelihood of a later transition to breastfeeding.

Transferable skills and personal qualities

  • Demonstrate self-awareness, sensitivity and effective communication with mothers, partners, families and colleagues, especially at times of stress and demonstrate a commitment to team-working
  • Display full recognition of their accountability for their own practice, in accordance with the Midwives Rules and practice within the limitations of their own knowledge and expertise.
  • Identify their own learning and support needs in discussion with mentors and tutors, and be proactive in seeking appropriate learning experiences.

Assessment methods

Method Weight
Written assignment (inc essay) 50%
Practical skills assessment 50%

Feedback methods

Students will normally have the opportunity to receive feedback on formative work submitted prior to the summative assessment. Other feedback opportunities will also be available in class and online discussion boards. Online feedback is provided in Grademark. Provisional feedback based on internal marking will be made available prior to the Exam Board on the basis that these marks are yet to be ratified at the Exam Board and therefore may be subject to change. A standard feedback mechanism in Grademark is utilised across all undergraduate programmes within the School which provides detailed and constructive feedback on each component and aspect of assessment and identifies areas of strength and those aspects which could be enhanced.

Student feedback is obtained through open discussion forums on blackboard, in class discussions, via formal University unit evaluation forms and also qualitative, in house evaluations at the end of the unit. 

Recommended reading

Study hours

Scheduled activity hours
Lectures 25
Practical classes & workshops 1
Seminars 3
Tutorials 7
Placement hours
Placement 142.5
Independent study hours
Independent study 120.5

Teaching staff

Staff member Role
Alison Busby Unit coordinator

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