Clearing 2022

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BASS Social Anthropology and Philosophy

Year of entry: 2022

Course unit details:
Anthropology of Displacement and Migration

Course unit fact file
Unit code SOAN30451
Credit rating 20
Unit level Level 3
Teaching period(s) Semester 1
Offered by School of Social Sciences
Available as a free choice unit? Yes

Overview

 

Anthropology of Displacement and Migration:  Why and how do people move?

 

This course aims to introduce students to anthropological literature on migration and displacement and to critically examine some of the key issues at the forefront of contemporary public debates (in the UK and beyond).  The course is centred on a number of highly charged issues such as deportation, statelessness, illegality, and compassion.  We will draw on a wide range of theoretical literature and ethnographic contexts in order to explore anthropology’s contribution in challenging what is often simplistically portrayed as a global, migration ‘crisis’. Do labels and categories (e.g. asylum seeker, economic migrant) shed light on obscure experiences of migration and displacement? How do we make sense of entrapments and detention in a world on the move? What are the implications of regimes of mobility for the lives of citizens and migrants? As we address salient issues, the module will enhance students’ understanding of debates surrounding contentious policies and practices affecting those who have moved as well as those who have stayed behind, been sent back or remained stranded.

Aims

 

Anthropology of Displacement and Migration:  Why and how do people move?

 

This course aims to introduce students to anthropological literature on migration and displacement and to critically examine some of the key issues at the forefront of contemporary public debates (in the UK and beyond).  The course is centred on a number of highly charged issues such as deportation, statelessness, illegality, and compassion.  We will draw on a wide range of theoretical literature and ethnographic contexts in order to explore anthropology’s contribution in challenging what is often simplistically portrayed as a global, migration ‘crisis’. Do labels and categories (e.g. asylum seeker, economic migrant) shed light on obscure experiences of migration and displacement? How do we make sense of entrapments and detention in a world on the move? What are the implications of regimes of mobility for the lives of citizens and migrants? As we address salient issues, the module will enhance students’ understanding of debates surrounding contentious policies and practices affecting those who have moved as well as those who have stayed behind, been sent back or remained stranded.

Learning outcomes

 

Anthropology of Displacement and Migration:  Why and how do people move?

 

This course aims to introduce students to anthropological literature on migration and displacement and to critically examine some of the key issues at the forefront of contemporary public debates (in the UK and beyond).  The course is centred on a number of highly charged issues such as deportation, statelessness, illegality, and compassion.  We will draw on a wide range of theoretical literature and ethnographic contexts in order to explore anthropology’s contribution in challenging what is often simplistically portrayed as a global, migration ‘crisis’. Do labels and categories (e.g. asylum seeker, economic migrant) shed light on obscure experiences of migration and displacement? How do we make sense of entrapments and detention in a world on the move? What are the implications of regimes of mobility for the lives of citizens and migrants? As we address salient issues, the module will enhance students’ understanding of debates surrounding contentious policies and practices affecting those who have moved as well as those who have stayed behind, been sent back or remained stranded.

Syllabus

Teaching will consist of ten two-hour lecture classes.  There will also be ten one-hour seminars with student-led discussions.  Online resources will include digitised copies of key texts on Blackboard.

 

Teaching and learning methods

Teaching will consist of ten two-hour lecture classes.  There will also be ten one-hour seminars with student-led discussions.  Online resources will include digitised copies of key texts on Blackboard.

 

Knowledge and understanding

 

Anthropology of Displacement and Migration:  Why and how do people move?

 

This course aims to introduce students to anthropological literature on migration and displacement and to critically examine some of the key issues at the forefront of contemporary public debates (in the UK and beyond).  The course is centred on a number of highly charged issues such as deportation, statelessness, illegality, and compassion.  We will draw on a wide range of theoretical literature and ethnographic contexts in order to explore anthropology’s contribution in challenging what is often simplistically portrayed as a global, migration ‘crisis’. Do labels and categories (e.g. asylum seeker, economic migrant) shed light on obscure experiences of migration and displacement? How do we make sense of entrapments and detention in a world on the move? What are the implications of regimes of mobility for the lives of citizens and migrants? As we address salient issues, the module will enhance students’ understanding of debates surrounding contentious policies and practices affecting those who have moved as well as those who have stayed behind, been sent back or remained stranded.

Assessment methods

Method Weight
Written exam 100%

Feedback methods

Students will receive feedback via:

  • Discussions in lectures and seminars
  • Questions you bring to the instructor during office hours
  • Written feedback on the exam

Recommended reading

Andersson, Reuben. 2014. Illegality, Inc.: Clandestine Migration and the Business of Bordering Europe. California.

 

Brettell, Caroline 2003. Anthropology and Migration: Essays on Transnationalism, Ethnicity and Identity. Walnut Creek: Altamira.

 

Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, Elena, Gil Loescher, Katy Long, Nando Sigona, Katy Long, and Nando Sigona. 2014. The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies. The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies.

 

Sayad, Abdelmalek. 2004. The Suffering of the Immigrant. Cambridge: Polity.

 

Study hours

Scheduled activity hours
Assessment practical exam 3
Lectures 20
Tutorials 10
Independent study hours
Independent study 167

Teaching staff

Staff member Role
Sebastien Bachelet Unit coordinator

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